51

Re: The 60s James Bond Rivals (1): Matt Helm

Thunderpussy wrote:

I love Matt sliding down the train track on the hill.

yes I didnt understand that either. The train didn't look like a funicular but for some reason the grade on those tracks was as steep as a playground slide.

Thunderpussy do you have any Little Niggles with the Matt Helm movies or do the plots all all make complete sense to you?

52

Re: The 60s James Bond Rivals (1): Matt Helm

Caractacus  I have an odd relationship with the Matt Helm Movies, as I'm a big
Dean Martin fan. I don't look at them as espionage movies, just a Dean Martin
adventure where he plays at being a secret agent. After all the amount of Jokes
about his drinking etc  ajb007/biggrin
   As a Kid I did enjoy the fight sequences, as they were the nearest to actual
Martial arts we got on TV. He could also be the reason I became a professional
Photographer for 15 tears  ajb007/wink  as it looked fun.
As pointed out by others much more knowledgeable than me, the likes of
Moonraker has more to do with Matt Helm than anything Fleming wrote. Although
Then again it suited the time is was made. I always thought the Helm movies were
cheap fun churned out by the studio but ( On reading one of Barbel's posts ) Dean
Martin refused to travel so everything had to be filmed  " Austin Powers " style
around california.
  Not to spoil anything but In one film he got a cut down Helicopter, which also
( to me at least ) looked frighteningly Dangerous for the pilot , as there was no
canopy and the blades were spinning just above " Matt's" head, without even a Helmet
Although I guess it wouldn't really have helped if the blade had cut in to him  ajb007/crap
  They are simply silly, fun movies so I don't hold them to the same standard of Bond
or Bourne etc.

“I remember the last thing my Nan said to me before she died.
‘What are you doing here with that hammer?’”..... Lee Mack.

53

Re: The 60s James Bond Rivals (1): Matt Helm

Thunderpussy wrote:

I don't look at them as espionage movies, just a Dean Martin
adventure where he plays at being a secret agent.

This is probably the healthiest attitude, the only way to watch these films and stay sane.
Still in this case I do suspect there was some plot information that was deemed not important enough to include in the final edit.

54

Re: The 60s James Bond Rivals (1): Matt Helm

Finally made it to the end of The Wrecking Crew.

I had just watched Nigel Green and Elke Sommer as near identical villains in the Bulldog Drummond movie Deadlier Than the Male, made the previous year. Strange this film should recycle the exact same villains. Elke was much more entertaining in the Drummond film. Green was better in the Ipcress File than in either of these other films.

Tina Louise's part is much too small. She displays some acting chops, playing a very different character than Ginger, even if sleazy music still plays whenever she wiggles onscreen.

Sharon Tate is playing a variation on Stella Stevens' klutz character from the first film, but varied with a deadpan obliviousness to her own incompetence that produces some laffs.


I'm certainly glad I watched these, always enjoy more vintage 60s spyflicks, and good to see where so much of Austin Powers came from.
Yet just as glad I did not invest $40- in the box set when I had the chance.

And why were the 1970s Roger Moore Bonds borrowing ideas from these silly films when there was still so much genuine Fleming left to be adapted?

55

Re: The 60s James Bond Rivals (1): Matt Helm

caractacus potts wrote:

Finally made it to the end of The Wrecking Crew.

I had just watched Nigel Green and Elke Sommer as near identical villains in the Bulldog Drummond movie Deadlier Than the Male, made the previous year. Strange this film should recycle the exact same villains. Elke was much more entertaining in the Drummond film. Green was better in the Ipcress File than in either of these other films.

I'm familiar with Deadlier Than the Male too, though I thought it frustratingly low-key and too London-centric for a film which was trying to ape the Bondian travelogues of the '60s. The Wrecking Ball was unwatchable, though I did try to see it twice.

If you'd like to see Nigel Green be properly sinister, check out the blind-person-in-peril thriller Witness in the Dark from 1959.