26

Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

I guess it also depends on your definition of a "family film". There are films made for families (someone mentioned Mary Poppins earlier) and films that are not intended to be family films but which families will watch together. Many Bond films fit into the latter category, none fit into the former.

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

HowardB wrote:

seeing Bond in TB pinning one of Largo's henchmen to a Palm Tree with a well placed shot through the neck with a spear gun.

Memories can be deceiving. It was not as violent as a spear in the neck.


https://i.postimg.cc/JH55g2VB/He-Got-The-Point.jpg

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

Agent Eternal wrote:
HowardB wrote:

seeing Bond in TB pinning one of Largo's henchmen to a Palm Tree with a well placed shot through the neck with a spear gun.

Memories can be deceiving. It was not as violent as a spear in the neck.


https://i.postimg.cc/JH55g2VB/He-Got-The-Point.jpg

You are absolutely correct and despite my living fossil status I have seen TB enough times over the years that I should have remembered that correctly. Still one hell of a classic Bond moment especially given the absolute ultimate cool displayed by Connery in that scene and of course the pun afterwards....and of course beautifully edited by Peter Hunt. "Violent and sadistic" was a description many critics used during that era to describe the first four Connery Bonds.

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

The OP has it correct.
GE was more fun than LTK but can never really fill the Bank Holiday Monday Bond slot and none of them subsequently do.
It's a shame because really some of them should have, at least one or two. But they were trying to distance the films from the previous family fun stuff, even toning down the colour I think.
Fans of Spectre forget the eye-gouging scene which is cut from TV prints, along with Craig's gruelling kill in Haiti (the cuts improve both films greatly imo).

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

30

Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

I don't think the Bond films are for kids. They can watch them with adult supervision.

Dr No was basically boiled alive in his own nuclear reactor. Even before LTK, there was at least one death where it would appear gruesome. The snowplough in OHMSS, the  KGB agent being thrown into the propeller and there's even a deleted scene in The Living Daylights, where it was implied that Saunders was bisected with the glass door.

I don't think the sex scenes have been expicit before Goldeneye

Have you ever heard of the Emancipation Proclamation?"

" I don't listen to hip hop!"

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

First i saw was YOLT in '88 (shouldve told Dor her death scene scared me , bet shed chuckle  ajb007/lol

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

Is there anyone here who saw their first Bond or became a fan after the age of 18 though? It appeals to kids.

33

Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

I think the Bond films appeal to children at first and then stay with you through life. The only films where the violence bothered me as a child were LTK for fairly obvious reasons, the fight in the safehouse and the fake assassination of Pushkin in TLD, and the killing of the British sailors in TND. Most of the other Bond films, pre-Craig, I thought were relatively tame from an older child's point of view.

34

Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

When Target Books published a range of novelisations of TV's 'Doctor Who' serials they described the show as "The children's own programme which adults adore." Perhaps that could be flipped for the Bond films: "The adults' own franchise which children adore." In my case I first saw DN and other violent Bond films when I was really quite young but I loved every minute of them.

I'd suggest it was mainly TSWLM and MR which positioned themselves as family entertainment - particularly if we bear in mind that, at the time, in the 70s, there was a broadly more permissive notion of what was appropriate for younger viewers, compared with today.

Critics and material I don't need. I haven't changed my act in 49 years.

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

Maybe, but then look at the amount of Bond toys there were in the 60s: the Corgi DB5 with the little plastic ejector seat. I’d say they were for kids from very early on.

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

Good point. And if Corgi saw an opportunity in the DB5, it's almost as if the submersile Lotus saw an opportunity in Corgi. I think the character of Jaws screams 'thrills for the kids' more than any other Bond icon.

Critics and material I don't need. I haven't changed my act in 49 years.

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

I think it's interesting that so many fans -I'm not talking about you Shady- look to deny that these films engage kids and are often made to do that, even though pretty much all of us started watching them when we were kids. Is it because we don't want to admit we're still interested in something that's fairly childish?

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

Shady Tree wrote:

When Target Books published a range of novelisations of TV's 'Doctor Who' serials they described the show as "The children's own programme which adults adore." Perhaps that could be flipped for the Bond films: "The adults' own franchise which children adore." In my case I first saw DN and other violent Bond films when I was really quite young but I loved every minute of them.

I'd suggest it was mainly TSWLM and MR which positioned themselves as family entertainment - particularly if we bear in mind that, at the time, in the 70s, there was a broadly more permissive notion of what was appropriate for younger viewers, compared with today.

In my own case, it would be an adult who acts like a child ajb007/lol

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Re: When did Bond films stop being family oriented?

Shady Tree wrote:

When Target Books published a range of novelisations of TV's 'Doctor Who' serials they described the show as "The children's own programme which adults adore."

Ah, Target books... The seventies... I am cast back in time when 'family' meant 3 generations in the same room doing the same thing. Tho' it was only me who read Dr. Who.


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