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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

the original question was indeed pretty interesting

Blofeld actually 1st appears in FRWL, all we see is the back of his head and the cat, but he does the usual blofeld thang of appearing to condemn one underlings performance then killing the other while the first watches
then appears again in TB, again we dont see his face
do we learn his name in either movie?
is it in the credits?
SPECTRE is mentioned in DN but theres no clue it has a leader, let alone a bald man with a cat

it could be argued Blofeld is a character created for the movies
Fleming & Kevin mcClory created him and SPECTRE for the original screenplay of TB
this would have been the first film  but stuff happened
for wellknown reaons that I wont get into cuz Id have to say the word fleming a few times, DN became the 1st film and TB film 4
but the concept of SPECTRE did work its way into film 1 anyway, and blofelds bald head began appearing in film 2

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

I'm too lazy to fiddle with html tags right now (one of my unfortunate job duties), therefore...

In response to crawfordboon's example of Moonraker:  If this film was to be granted a life of it's own, why even use the title or the villain's name?  What would be the point?  Why couldn't they have just titled the movie, "Space Shuttle" and call the villain something else?  Ergo, my point, that the film series will never fully be able to separate itself from Fleming, even if the producers chooses to do so because Fleming is hard-coded into the character and basic storyline...otherwise, it would be like changing the genetic coding of a hamster to turn it into a parakeet.

In response to Dan Same's example of OHMSS:  Because this arguably is one of the most painstakingly faithful adaptations of a Fleming story, you cannot fully appreciate the merits of that film unless you read the book, period.  That is a fact; and this is one fact that you cannot go around, ignore or deny.  Sure, you can rest on OHMSS' pure entertainment value, but to do so sadly ignores the level of effort and input made by Peter Hunt, et al., in their artistic and intellectual collaboration with Fleming and his written word.

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Loeffelholz wrote:

I'll merely celebrate that Ian Fleming's 'stylistic albatross' is stamped all over CR.  ajb007/cheers

You're missing some really good books, cb  ajb007/confused but if you watch the new movie, you'll get more of that rotten old Fleming than you bargained for  ajb007/shifty  ajb007/lol

No hard feelings  ajb007/cool

Yep, it's like when we all went to see DAD, we were tricked into getting a dose of Madonna!  Apologies to old Ian for suggesting that parallel ajb007/lol

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

superado wrote:

In response to Dan Same's example of OHMSS:  Because this arguably is one of the most painstakingly faithful adaptations of a Fleming story, you cannot fully appreciate the merits of that film unless you read the book, period.  That is a fact; and this is one fact that you cannot go around, ignore or deny.  Sure, you can rest on OHMSS' pure entertainment value, but to do so sadly ignores the level of effort and input made by Peter Hunt, et al., in their artistic and intellectual collaboration with Fleming and his written word.

Just as in the 'assassin thread' Superado is here to tell us poor ignorant souls what's what. ajb007/rolleyes And just like in the thread, you end up proving nothing but you need to be reminded the difference between opinion and fact. You want facts? Here are three:

1)I can appreciate OHMSS just fine, thankyou. You do not know what OHMSS means to me and I appreciate it far more than for its entertainment value.

2)I have never cricised either Hunt or attempted to deny the faithfulness of OHMSS to the novel.  Perhaps you aren't aware that in my first thread on this thread, I DEFENDED OHMSS!

3)Fleming-like elements are NOT more valid than non-Fleming elements. They are simply different. You may believe that simply because you prefer the cinematic elements (including character) which are Fleming-like to the elements which are not, therefore it is fact, well let me remind you that unless you suddenly become ruler of the Bond universe, your opinion is simply an opinion; and one which I greatly disagree with.

Last edited by Dan Same (3rd Nov 2006 17:28)

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman

30

Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Dan Same wrote:
superado wrote:

In response to Dan Same's example of OHMSS:  Because this arguably is one of the most painstakingly faithful adaptations of a Fleming story, you cannot fully appreciate the merits of that film unless you read the book, period.  That is a fact; and this is one fact that you cannot go around, ignore or deny.  Sure, you can rest on OHMSS' pure entertainment value, but to do so sadly ignores the level of effort and input made by Peter Hunt, et al., in their artistic and intellectual collaboration with Fleming and his written word.

Just as in the 'assassin thread' Superado is here to tell us poor ignorant souls what's what. ajb007/rolleyes And just like in the thread, you end up proving nothing but you need to be reminded the difference between opinion and fact. You want facts? Here are three:

1)I can appreciate OHMSS just fine, thankyou. You do not know what OHMSS means to me and I appreciate it far more than for its entertainment value.

2)I have never cricised either Hunt or attempted to deny the faithfulness of OHMSS to the novel.  Perhaps you aren't aware that in my first thread on this thread, I DEFENDED OHMSS!

3)Fleming-like elements are NOT more valid than non-Fleming elements. They are simply different. You may believe that simply because you prefer the cinematic elements (including character) which are Fleming-like to the elements which are not, therefore it is fact, well let me remind you that unless you suddenly become ruler of the Bond universe, your opinion is simply an opinion; and one which I greatly disagree with.

"Superado is here to tell us poor ignorant souls what's what. "

Well, it's obvious that you need help.  ***strokes Dan Same on the head*** ...you're crying out, the symptoms are all there...

How did I make myself "ruler of the Bond universe?"  Please don't preach to me about opinions, because stating them is one thing, but it's totally another when asserting them in the face of others, untiringly, and I mean on and on and on, desperately trying to get in the last word, tire out other people (which you do to me), apparently as your attempt to "win" by the quantity of your arguments vs. the quality/validity (or lack therof). 

And how did I "prove nothing"?  Just by your ludicrous statement that "Fleming-like elements are NOT more valid than non-Fleming elements. They are simply different..." is evidence in itself that I don't even need to prove anything...you speak loudly about yourself and the weakness of your position.  Just look at what you're saying...think about it...no Fleming, no Bond, period.  You can take out any of the other extraneous elements added onto the product "after the fact," such as the requisite martinis, tuxedos and the whole EON formula, and you are still left with Bond.  You take out Fleming from the series, and you get Austin Powers.

Nonetheless, there are people out there who firmly believe that the whole NASA program has from the begining been a set up on a Hollywood stage, and even Aristotle would not be able to convince them otherwise.  You are too predictable, and I can count on another response from you in the form of an F-grade, 2000 word essay that like the others...I won't even bother to read ajb007/wink

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

caractacus potts wrote:

the original question was indeed pretty interesting

Blofeld actually 1st appears in FRWL, all we see is the back of his head and the cat, but he does the usual blofeld thang of appearing to condemn one underlings performance then killing the other while the first watches
then appears again in TB, again we dont see his face
do we learn his name in either movie?
is it in the credits?
SPECTRE is mentioned in DN but theres no clue it has a leader, let alone a bald man with a cat

it could be argued Blofeld is a character created for the movies
Fleming & Kevin mcClory created him and SPECTRE for the original screenplay of TB
this would have been the first film  but stuff happened
for wellknown reaons that I wont get into cuz Id have to say the word fleming a few times, DN became the 1st film and TB film 4
but the concept of SPECTRE did work its way into film 1 anyway, and blofelds bald head began appearing in film 2

Well said, I too think the original thread starter was interesting and provoking, it got us talking, didn't it?

I'd just like to take the Ned Flanders view, we'll "Agree to disagree." ajb007/smile

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Here I go again attempting to have the last word. I thought this was a discussion site. ajb007/amazed

superado wrote:

How did I make myself "ruler of the Bond universe?"  Please don't preach to me about opinions, because stating them is one thing, but it's totally another when asserting them in the face of others, untiringly, and I mean on and on and on, desperately trying to get in the last word, tire out other people (which you do to me), apparently as your attempt to "win" by the quantity of your arguments vs. the quality/validity (or lack therof).

Then don't respond. I don't care. All I am doing is engaging in a discussion using logic and reason. If it tires you out, then ignore me and do something less tiresome. ajb007/rolleyes Just do whatever you want and stop publicizing it as if I should care because I couldn't care less wether you find my posts tiring or what you do with yourself. I will continue to post because I enjoy doing so and because this is a discussion site. As for winning, I don't care if you end up agreeing with me or not. I just resent it when you phrase opinions as facts. Which you do. All the time. I'll respond to some of you other posts. I don't expect a response as it would be too tiresome for you to do so. ajb007/rolleyes 

superado wrote:

And how did I "prove nothing"?  Just by your ludicrous statement that "Fleming-like elements are NOT more valid than non-Fleming elements. They are simply different..." is evidence in itself that I don't even need to prove anything...you speak loudly about yourself and the weakness of your position.  Just look at what you're saying...think about it...no Fleming, no Bond, period.  You can take out any of the other extraneous elements added onto the product "after the fact," such as the requisite martinis, tuxedos and the whole EON formula, and you are still left with Bond.  You take out Fleming from the series, and you get Austin Powers.

Do you ever read my posts? No, obviously not. You know, I find it interesting that in my first post on this site, I expressed admiration for Fleming, defended OHMSS, and now you think that I'm denying Fleming created Bond. ajb007/confused You must really have something against me. As a matter of fact, this post proves how weak your position is (is this an example of me trying to 'win?' ajb007/rolleyes ) as you not only ignored my first response to you, which sets out my argument perfectly, but you fail to see that the issue isn't about wether or not Fleming created Bond. The issue is wether or not the films, since the creation of Bond by Fleming (I should stop acknowledging his contribution as it proves how ridiculous your charges are), when differing from the novels, are as good as the novels. If you honestly think that one can't prefer non Fleming-like elements to Fleming-like elements, simple because Fleming created the Bond films ajb007/amazed which according to you is all that matters, then you truly don't know what you're talking about.

superado wrote:

Nonetheless, there are people out there who firmly believe that the whole NASA program has from the begining been a set up on a Hollywood stage, and even Aristotle would not be able to convince them otherwise.

I take it that you're one of them then. ajb007/rolleyes

superado wrote:

You are too predictable, and I can count on another response from you in the form of an F-grade, 2000 word essay that like the others...I won't even bother to read ajb007/wink

Ooh, personal insults. I'm glad I'm predictable, if that's the worst someone can call me, then that's fine with me. As for  F-grade, 2000 word essays, well, actually, I've never gotten an F in my entire life. Not even in year 9 when I barely studied for the math test. ajb007/biggrin Thankyou though. The fact that you describe my posts as 'F-grade' (as opposed to your 'masterpieces') means that I'll know that when I want help regarding structuring an argument, I certainly won't come to you.

Finally, I don't care if you read this or not, I'm actually writing this for my own enjoyment. I enjoy tearing apart ridiculous and (what's your word?) F-grade posts. It's fun. ajb007/smile

Last edited by Dan Same (3rd Nov 2006 18:38)

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Without reading the above, again a statement of mine, or rather, a prediction proved to be true ajb007/lol 

The fact remains, one cannot fully appreciate OHMSS without reading the book.  Ten thousand words to the contrary cannot refute that fact.

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

34

Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Actually, I've been re-reading all of the Flemings in order this year, and I'm now 3/4 of the way through OHMSS...I haven't read it in twenty years, at least, and I'm reminded why it's my favourite of his books...

That moment when Bond's 'Station Z' ally is captured by Blofeld's men, recognizes Bond and blows his cover...Blofeld turns to Bond and asks him if he's in any way associated with the British Secret Service...  ajb007/cool  Classic.  Just Classic.  ajb007/bond

As good as the film is...the book is BETTER...

Last edited by Loeffelholz (3rd Nov 2006 18:46)

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

35

Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

that is a disturbing scene
Bond had seen many friends, allies, and lovers get themselves killed, tortured, commit suicide, or be fed to the sharks up til this point*
but thats the 1st time he had to betray a friend for the greater good
undoubtedly added to his doubts about his choice of profession, and his decision to settle down

I gotta say, if you do read all 14 books in one sitting as I and Loeffelolz and others have been doing, OHMSS makes much more sense
there is a character arc that begins with Vespers suicide that comes to a head in OHMSS
the movies do not provide this underlying logic as movieBond
1) does not feel selfdoubt about his profession
and
2) does not worry about his inability to have  a normal healthy relationship with a woman
_______________________________
*off the top of my head: Vesper, Leiter, the cabbie in DaF, Kerim Bey, Quarrell, and both Masterton sisters all paid the price for entering the life of our hero
007s life must be a lonely one

Last edited by caractacus potts (3rd Nov 2006 19:08)

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Loeffelholz wrote:

Actually, I've been re-reading all of the Flemings in order this year, and I'm now 3/4 of the way through OHMSS...I haven't read it in twenty years, at least, and I'm reminded why it's my favourite of his books...

That moment when Bond's 'Station Z' ally is captured by Blofeld's men, recognizes Bond and blows his cover...Blofeld turns to Bond and asks him if he's in any way associated with the British Secret Service...  ajb007/cool  Classic.  Just Classic.  ajb007/bond

As good as the film is...the book is BETTER...

BTW, OHMSS is my favorite novel and Bond film.

Thank you, yes, and how can one possibly arrive at your conclusion, unless you've studied both works?  ...which makes your opinion an informed one.  It's like writing a research paper; you must first gather a good representation of sources, which often have differing conclusions, before making any informed conclusion of your own.

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Loeffelholz wrote:

As good as the film is...the book is BETTER...

I have to agree with that! Blofeld became more and more menacing as the novels went on. Unlike, as crawfordboon lays out in the beginning of this thread, he becomes less and less of a threat. I think CFBs analysis is very accurate...not necessarily intentional by the filmmakers, I gather...but interesting nonetheless.

OHMSS and the subsequent YOLT were simply some of the best page-turning novels. And Blofeld was a character that was overall handled weakly. The OHMSS movie was probably the best portrayal (sorry, Mr. Pleasance) at establishing the Holmes/Moriarty type rivalry. In no other Blofeld appearance in the film did I get a sense that Blofeld was a 'threat' to Bond. He might have been a danger to the world, but in OHMSS we see physicality and a real personal involvement by Blofeld to wreak destruction.

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

And I thought it was me who wanted the last word? ajb007/rolleyes

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Holmes and Moriarty is an excellent example, dh.  To me, that's exactly what Fleming was going after...and he succeeded masterfully...

Last edited by Loeffelholz (3rd Nov 2006 19:21)

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

40

Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

darenhat wrote:
Loeffelholz wrote:

As good as the film is...the book is BETTER...

I have to agree with that! Blofeld became more and more menacing as the novels went on. Unlike, as crawfordboon lays out in the beginning of this thread, he becomes less and less of a threat. I think CFBs analysis is very accurate...not necessarily intentional by the filmmakers, I gather...but interesting nonetheless.

OHMSS and the subsequent YOLT were simply some of the best page-turning novels. And Blofeld was a character that was overall handled weakly. The OHMSS movie was probably the best portrayal (sorry, Mr. Pleasance) at establishing the Holmes/Moriarty type rivalry. In no other Blofeld appearance in the film did I get a sense that Blofeld was a 'threat' to Bond. He might have been a danger to the world, but in OHMSS we see physicality and a real personal involvement by Blofeld to wreak destruction.

The Holmes/Moriarty parallel exactly describes what I wished for the Bond/Blofeld relationship, which this thread had me thinking about and I agree that this could have been better developed in the novels.  Despite of whatever is lacking, however, Bond's focus on this relationship at soul angst levels was conveyed well enough and it's no coincidence that Blofeld was directly and indirectly involved with Bond's mid-life events when he began growing more philisophical and reflective about his life (note his recollections of childhood in OHMSS), questioning meaning in his career, bachelorhood, etc. 

As with Moriarty, anything and everything with meaning to Bond came to a head during his final encounter with his enemy...just plain classic...resulting in such a dramatic change in Bond's reality, one even more drastic than say, ordinary marriage (meaning, how married life would have been like had Tracy lived), a rebirth almost (and literally) as reality-altering as death itself, hence the title and theme of the YOLT novel, of course.

In the movies, we instead get a Blofeld plunging down a smokestack while a charming, smiling Bond gives us a twinkle in his eye. ajb007/wink

Last edited by superado (3rd Nov 2006 20:11)

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

"Die, Blofeld, die!"  - Bond, through clenched teeth, in You Only Live Twice...

ajb007/cool

Last edited by Loeffelholz (3rd Nov 2006 19:38)

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

42

Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Dan Same wrote:

And I thought it was me who wanted the last word? ajb007/rolleyes

Which you did get in, for you in record succinctness...oops, sorry, no you didn't.

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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superado wrote:

Which you did get in, for you in record succinctness...oops, sorry, no you didn't.

I have never denied I was predictable. Unlike certain other people on this board, that's probably the worst you can say about me. You, on the other hand, claimed that you would ignore me as you were 'tired' of speaking to me and accused me of always wanting the last word. ajb007/rolleyes But look at this, you have responded to me two times! I guess if I am predictable, you are a hyppocrit. ajb007/rolleyes Go ahead, respond and prove me wrong! ajb007/lol

Last edited by Dan Same (4th Nov 2006 08:28)

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

Tell you what, Dan...I'll respond for him. I tend to agree with superado's assessment that the position you are arguing is not very tenable. Fleming elements are a great deal more important to the series than you would like to admit. Case in point: the top four films in your Favorite Bond Films are all very close adaptations of the Fleming novels. OHMSS, which you adore, also ranks very high on your list. Your own list shows that the films that depart from Fleming aren't as liked by you than those that try to remain faithful. The fact that EON is trying to make a faithful adaptation of CR is just proof that the people in the film side heavily rely on Fleming's vision in the novels. I'm not saying you have to read the novels (I enjoyed the movies for years before I seriously delved in the books) but that fact that you haven't read the novels, and aren't very eager to, means that you cannot clearly make a distinction of the importance of the novels' influences on the films. It is not hard for us to understand your point of view, but it is very difficult for you to fully grasp our perspective since you admittedly haven't read the books. It is akin to telling someone the world is round, when they percieve it to be flat, and they refuse to believe anything other than what they can see.

The books are very enjoyable. I recommend them to any fan of adventure and spy fiction. If you don't like to read, well, I guess I can't help you there.

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darenhat wrote:

Tell you what, Dan...I'll respond for him. I tend to agree with superado's assessment that the position you are arguing is not very tenable. Fleming elements are a great deal more important to the series than you would like to admit. Case in point: the top four films in your Favorite Bond Films are all very close adaptations of the Fleming novels. OHMSS, which you adore, also ranks very high on your list. Your own list shows that the films that depart from Fleming aren't as liked by you than those that try to remain faithful. The fact that EON is trying to make a faithful adaptation of CR is just proof that the people in the film side heavily rely on Fleming's vision in the novels. I'm not saying you have to read the novels (I enjoyed the movies for years before I seriously delved in the books) but that fact that you haven't read the novels, and aren't very eager to, means that you cannot clearly make a distinction of the importance of the novels' influences on the films.

The thing is however, I have never denied the importance of Fleming. My contention was that many of the elements that I do like may be non-Fleming which does not make them invalid and similarly many of the elements that I dislike are FLeming-like. Yes, most of my favourite elements are Fleming-like (of course, he created the chatacter and provided the source material) but it's not always the case. The first half of DAD is often described as very Fleming-like. The thing is, however, I hated it. Does that mean that I don't like Fleming or don't admire him? Of course not. It's simply that I don't agree with the view that everytime the cinematic Bond differed from the literature Bond, its quality automatically drops and everytime it is completely faithful, its quality automatically rises. Therefore, TSWLM may not be particularly Fleming-like, but I still consider it to be among the absolute Best Bond films ever made. Similarly, I love Moore and hate Dalton, regardless of how faithful Moore isn't and Dalton is.

I don't know why that is so controversial. It wasn't me who dismissed Fleming on this thread. It is simply that while many of my favourite cinematic elements come from Fleming, some of my favourite cinematic elements do not, and I will not be looking forward to Bond's being tortured in CR and having self doubts, even if it is pure Fleming.

darenhat wrote:

It is not hard for us to understand your point of view, but it is very difficult for you to fully grasp our perspective since you admittedly haven't read the books. It is akin to telling someone the world is round, when they percieve it to be flat, and they refuse to believe anything other than what they can see.

Except I was only stating my opinion! If one uses torture as an example, my saying that I don't think that Bond's being tortured shouldn't be in the films, isn't saying that the world is flat. It is simply my opinion. See, that is one of the things that really annoyed me when I was having the conversation with the other person. I wasn't denying any facts or stating anything that is blatently untrue. I was simply expressing an opinion, which is equally as valid as other (perhaps majority) opinions. Additionally, how can you claim to understand my point of view since I had to explain it on this thread? ajb007/biggrin


darenhat wrote:

The books are very enjoyable. I recommend them to any fan of adventure and spy fiction. If you don't like to read, well, I guess I can't help you there.

I can assure you, I love to read. ajb007/biggrin (Although I don't seem to have the time anymore. ajb007/rolleyes)

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

***while breathing heavily and typing at a fever pitch****

must...get...my...opinion...out...there (which is more "equally valid" than superado's) ajb007/mad

-DS

...which stands for??? ajb007/lol ajb007/lol ajb007/lol

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

47

Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

superado wrote:

The fact remains, one cannot fully appreciate OHMSS without reading the book.  Ten thousand words to the contrary cannot refute that fact.

I have to agree with supes on this point.  The novel and movie are very similar, but I think that they complemnt each other very well.  For example the novel goes into more detail about Blofelds snobbery and the influence power can have over people.  Additionally I felt that the scenes at Royale at the begininng of the novel were very emotional, it was the first time I ever truly sympathised with Bond.

Also, hearing Fleming go on about the differences between an alp and a piz add an interesting about of local character to the novel.  And hey! Theres Ursula Andress.

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Re: Thoughts on Ernest Blofeld

superado wrote:

***while breathing heavily and typing at a fever pitch****

must...get...my...opinion...out...there (which is more "equally valid" than superado's) ajb007/mad

-DS

...which stands for??? ajb007/lol ajb007/lol ajb007/lol

I guess this is you not responding to my posts. ajb007/rolleyes You're right though. My opinion is more valid than yours. Thank you for acknowledging that in your own nasty way. ajb007/smile

Last edited by Dan Same (9th Nov 2006 11:34)

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman