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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

Asp9mm wrote:

Q is the head of Q branch.  It's just a moniker for Quartermaster.  The was no 'Q' in the Fleming novels, just a Q Branch.

Fleming based Bond's service on SOE, that's why he works for another body separate from MI6, it was Deaver giving a nod to SOE and Fleming's connection with that organisation when he created the ODG.  M was the head of SOE - Gubbins.  As you said, Deaver really did do his research, and to his credit, the SOE connection wasn't as well known as it is today due to the documents being released recently.  Kudos to Deaver for that.

Agreed, it's not like reading a traditional Bond novel.  This Bond isn't born of the early 20th century, but of the 70's.  And couldn't ever be the same as the character Fleming created, or the Bond of the films.  It was a character in development and Deaver should have done two more.  I think it's the best modern Bond.  In fact, it is the only modern Bond, all the other novels have the same Bond but older.  Much older, or period set.  this is the first time Bond has been re-written for a modern reader.  It worked and was very successful.

I wouldn't have minded another Deaver book. He did show potential. I was aware that Q wasn't in the novels. I just like an excuse to complain I guess. ajb007/lol Wasn't aware of the Fleming connection to the SOE. Very interesting.
ajb007/martini

1. GE 2. CR 3. LTK 4. TLD 5. TB 6. GF 7. FRWL 8. DN 9. OHMSS 10. QOS 11. TND 12. TSWLM 13. FYEO 14. OP 15. MR 16. TWINE 17. DAD 18. SF 19. DAF 20. AVTAK 21. LALD 22. TMWTGG 23. YOLT 24. SP

1. Connery 2. Moore 3. Dalton 4. Brosnan 5. Craig 6. Lazenby

77

Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

This thread bump is timely because I recently re-read Carte Blanche.

When I initially read it shortly after it’s release, I remember enjoying it but thinking that Deaver may have slightly missed the mark. After reading it again, I must say that it’s truly a shame Deaver didn’t write another one because he did the best job possible of re-imagining the character for modern times. And I believe that Bond belongs in the present. I would much rather read something fresh and modern like Carte Blanche as opposed to an endless rehash 50s/60s era Bond (which feels irrelevant and will always pale in comparison to Fleming, regardless of how carefully the pastiche is executed).

I suppose at this point the ship has sailed and we will never get another Deaver Bond novel, but I’m still holding out hope. He definitely left some threads dangling.

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

Miles Messervy wrote:

This thread bump is timely because I recently re-read Carte Blanche.

When I initially read it shortly after it’s release, I remember enjoying it but thinking that Deaver may have slightly missed the mark. After reading it again, I must say that it’s truly a shame Deaver didn’t write another one because he did the best job possible of re-imagining the character for modern times. And I believe that Bond belongs in the present. I would much rather read something fresh and modern like Carte Blanche as opposed to an endless rehash 50s/60s era Bond (which feels irrelevant and will always pale in comparison to Fleming, regardless of how carefully the pastiche is executed).

I suppose at this point the ship has sailed and we will never get another Deaver Bond novel, but I’m still holding out hope. He definitely left some threads dangling.

Spot on!

..................http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a77/darkcrown_1969/Asp9mmSIG-1-2.jpg...............

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

Miles Messervy wrote:

I suppose at this point the ship has sailed and we will never get another Deaver Bond novel, but I’m still holding out hope. He definitely left some threads dangling.

I believe Antony Horowitz  is working on a sequel to Trigger Mortis, so it looks like he's got the job for now. I suppose they could have two separate continuation novelists on the payroll at the same time, but thatd be unprecedented, and the fact they're each writing in separate timelines (about separate Bonds) could get confusing.
Carte Blanche is the only one of the four recent oneshots I haven't read, so maybe I should, for completionism's sake. So, I gather the character is a new Bond, born in the 70s or so (certainly well after FlemingBond's last adventure). Which sounds similar to the whole Daniel Craig concept. So is DeaverBond the same as CraigBond, or yet another newBond?

pretty soon someone's going to need to write Crisis in Infinite Bond Timelines (joke for fans of DC Comics)

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

I avoided Horowitz’s first Bond and will likely do the same with the new one. Nothing against him. After Solo, I just decided that I’m sick of imitation Fleming.

Deaver did not do pastiche. But make no mistake: Deaver’s Bond is not not the film Bond. He is the literary Bond supplanted to the present day and updated accordingly (he’s a “former” smoker, Afghan war vet, not a bigot, etc.). But other elements, such as the descriptions of food and drink, are still there. Bond drives a Bentley. He wears a Rolex. You won’t have any trouble recognizing the character.

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

caractacus potts wrote:

I suppose they could have two separate continuation novelists on the payroll at the same time, but thatd be unprecedented, and the fact they're each writing in separate timelines (about separate Bonds) could get confusing.

like a bozoclown I forgot there's something called the Young Bond series, probably because I've never read it and I don't see it getting discussed here much

are the events in the Young Bond books ever referenced by any of the Grownup Bond continuation authors? are they consistent with what Fleming wrote, or Pearson's 007 Biography? or is it yet another selfcontained continuity, contradicting other versions of Bond we've seen in recent years?

82

Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

caractacus potts wrote:
caractacus potts wrote:

I suppose they could have two separate continuation novelists on the payroll at the same time, but thatd be unprecedented, and the fact they're each writing in separate timelines (about separate Bonds) could get confusing.

like a bozoclown I forgot there's something called the Young Bond series, probably because I've never read it and I don't see it getting discussed here much

are the events in the Young Bond books ever referenced by any of the Grownup Bond continuation authors? are they consistent with what Fleming wrote, or Pearson's 007 Biography? or is it yet another selfcontained continuity, contradicting other versions of Bond we've seen in recent years?

I’ve read all the Charlie Higson Young Bond stories and I’m 1.5/4 through Steve Cole’s, so to the best of my knowledge (also in trying to remember what’s been mentioned in the continuation novels), nothing in Young Bond beyond the details established by Fleming, has been referenced in the adult Bond books.  In the preface of Charlie Higson’s “Danger Society,” he acknowledges that Fleming likely didn’t envision anything else interesting or fantastic as he’d written that occurred in Bond’s young life, but like John Pearson, Young Bond is written within the parameters of the scant details given by Fleming, but of course with much creative yarn-spinning.  Case in point is the maid with whom James got into trouble at Eton, an episode which Higson elaborated on to be much more and disparate than what that phrase likely implied to the mind of readers.

The advantage of the Young Bond stories over the majority of the continuation novels, except those that maintained Fleming's original timeline, is that of course they were more consistent with Fleming's original creation, as well as the context of the key historical events that shaped Bond's world.

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

thanks Superado
I should give the Young Bond books a try
I keep forgetting about them because they're usually filed in the "young adult" section rather than mystery/thriller, with all the other Bond related books

84

Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

superado wrote:
caractacus potts wrote:
caractacus potts wrote:

I suppose they could have two separate continuation novelists on the payroll at the same time, but thatd be unprecedented, and the fact they're each writing in separate timelines (about separate Bonds) could get confusing.

like a bozoclown I forgot there's something called the Young Bond series, probably because I've never read it and I don't see it getting discussed here much

are the events in the Young Bond books ever referenced by any of the Grownup Bond continuation authors? are they consistent with what Fleming wrote, or Pearson's 007 Biography? or is it yet another selfcontained continuity, contradicting other versions of Bond we've seen in recent years?

I’ve read all the Charlie Higson Young Bond stories and I’m 1.5/4 through Steve Cole’s, so to the best of my knowledge (also in trying to remember what’s been mentioned in the continuation novels), nothing in Young Bond beyond the details established by Fleming, has been referenced in the adult Bond books.  In the preface of Charlie Higson’s “Danger Society,” he acknowledges that Fleming likely didn’t envision anything else interesting or fantastic as he’d written that occurred in Bond’s young life, but like John Pearson, Young Bond is written within the parameters of the scant details given by Fleming, but of course with much creative yarn-spinning.  Case in point is the maid with whom James got into trouble at Eton, an episode which Higson elaborated on to be much more and disparate than what that phrase likely implied to the mind of readers.

The advantage of the Young Bond stories over the majority of the continuation novels, except those that maintained Fleming's original timeline, is that of course they were more consistent with Fleming's original creation, as well as the context of the key historical events that shaped Bond's world.

caractacus potts wrote:

thanks Superado
I should give the Young Bond books a try
I keep forgetting about them because they're usually filed in the "young adult" section rather than mystery/thriller, with all the other Bond related books

You're welcome, Professor Potts!  I highly recommend Charlie Higson's books, which I find very atmospheric.  Only last month, I saved reading the short story "A Hard Man to Kill" from the Young Bond guide book, "Danger Society" and it was very satisfying though only around 50 pages long.  I'm reading Steve Cole's books out of order; the 2nd one of his I'm reading is Strike Lightning and it's been a struggle!

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

I tried the young Bond books Hurricane Gold, but it wasn't for me. I like my Bond
Drinking, shagging and shooting villains in the face  ajb007/biggrin

“I didn’t lose a friend, I just realised I never had one.”

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

I enjoyed Carte Blanche.  While not perfect, it does seem that Deaver was successful in putting together a Fleming-Style Bond for the 21st Century.  He used many of the same Fleming deceits, like brand name drops, and the character seemed very much like the Bond of the books.  I'd buy another Deaver Bond book without flinching.

The other throw-back books where OK, but really - WHY?

87

Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

Still trying to forget Deaver's acting turn on As The World Turns.   He was fine, but the laughable serial killer plot really needed his writing assistance.

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Re: Carte Blanche by Jeffery Deaver -- what do you think?

Thunderpussy wrote:

I tried the young Bond books Hurricane Gold, but it wasn't for me. I like my Bond
Drinking, shagging and shooting villains in the face  ajb007/biggrin

I'm content knowing that this young, gentlemanly lad will eventually be doing those things  ajb007/lol   Seriously, though, the rapport between young Bond and the young ladies is pretty interesting, kind of like adult Bond without the eventual conclusion, and the villains are pretty good too, esp. in how they get what's coming to them...but there's where the reality gets challenged, when young Bond undergoes painful physical trials and torture, very, very Fleming.  ajb007/mad

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....