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Sir Miles wrote:

Forever And A Death by Donald E Westlake

I read a lot of Westlake back in the 70s- the Dortmunder series, mainly, but one or two Parkers as well. Good writer.

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Barbel wrote:
Sir Miles wrote:

Forever And A Death by Donald E Westlake

I read a lot of Westlake back in the 70s- the Dortmunder series, mainly, but one or two Parkers as well. Good writer.

I’d never heard of him before  ajb007/embarrassed
As I said, it’s only because this is a supposedly rejected Bond screenplay/book that I bought it...

YNWA: Justice For The 96

The Joy Of 6

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You might have seen one of the films based on his books:

"Point Blank" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_Blank_(1967_film)

"The Hot Rock" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hot_Rock_(film)  aka "How To Steal A Diamond"

"Parker" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parker_(2013_film)

among others.

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Barbel wrote:

You might have seen one of the films based on his books:

"Point Blank" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_Blank_(1967_film)

"The Hot Rock" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hot_Rock_(film)  aka "How To Steal A Diamond"

"Parker" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parker_(2013_film)

among others.

Only seen Point Blank from those...I enjoyed that film.

YNWA: Justice For The 96

The Joy Of 6

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The End of the Affair by Graham Greene

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Will be doing a podcast on Casino Royale soon so I am rererererererererereading Ian Fleming's first novel and taking notes while doing it.

1. Ohmss   2. Frwl   3. Op   4. Tswlm   5. Tld   6. Ge  7. Yolt 8. Lald   9. Cr   10. Ltk   11. Dn   12. Gf   13. Qos   14. Mr   15. Tmwtgg   16. Fyeo   17. Twine   18. Sf   19. Tb   20 Tnd   21. Spectre   22 Daf   23. Avtak   24. Dad

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NC-MI6-00 wrote:

I've really enjoyed the writing of Daniel Silvia and the Gabriel Allon novels.  Any other fans of that series?  Thoughts?

Yes, another fan here, having read all of them. I've generally enjoyed them all, but I did find that a number of books in the series...

Spoilerfollowed the same format, in that Allon foils the enemy's plot, and then the book finishes with Allon coming back in the last scene to kill the enemy, which just got repetitive.

...Other than that, I would recommend them.

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Red Nemesis by Steve Cole

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Licence Expired: The Unauthorized James Bond
various authors, edited by Madeline Ashby and David Nickle
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51SGtHvJD5L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

A short story collection quickly rushed out in Canada when Fleming's James Bond books fell into the public domain in 2015. Probably not easily found elsewhere, and already out of print here. Most of the contributing authors, but not all, are from Canada, and strangely most are coming from a horror or science fiction genre background. The stories that I have read so far are roughly in chronological order, from points in time across Bond's life. The stories are specifically based on Fleming's Bond, and supporting characters and concepts, due to the nature of the copyright lapse, so nothing from the films.

As the stories are all by all different authors, and are very short, I have been reading the book one or two stories at a time, in between other books. I shall try to summarise the stories I've read so far. These are all highly apocryphal, and by the very nature of the collection most Bondfans may never have a chance to read them, but they are now published James Bond stories that deserve to be discussed.


The afterword by editor Madeline Ashby tells us of her "evil social justice agenda". She wished they could have got more diversity of contributing authors, with more diverse points of view, because the Bond character is such a privileged straight white male, much of the world cannot relate and is excluded from the fantasy. (as always I wonder why not just write about a new character then? This book cannot be sold outside Canada, so it's not as if having his name in the title is helping to sell product in this case!)
The positive side of that argument is writers are encouraged to present the character from an angle that more official product would not dare. We have discussed before how very safe, and formulaic, the official films and continuation authors play it. So these authors are freed to examine aspects of the Bond fantasy with previously untapped potential. Several of the stories are told from different characters' point of view, and at least one radically recasts the whole concept from the ground up.


story 1: One is Sorrow, Jaqueline Baker
the Eton chambermaid incident, from the chambermaid's point of view. Charlotte Brawn is a townie with a job at the school, attracted to the brooding yet chivalrous young Bond. There is a mysterious drowning in which Bond is implicated, but all we learn is filtered through the naive imagination of the narrator.
This is a good start, similar to Vivienne Michelle's unreliable narrative. And extra appreciated since Pearson claimed there was no chambermaid incident!

story 2: the Gales of the World, Robert J. Wiersama
after the war, but before being promoted to double oh, Bond enters the world of H. P. Lovecraft, assigned to recover the Necronomicon and witnessing firsthand the Elder Gods in a bit of psychedelia. This is definitely something an official Bond story would not dare to do, getting a bit Indiana Jones, and with a framing sequence that is a whole lotta X-Files (the author is from Vancouver, where the first five seasons of  the X-Files were filmed). This is the story where we learn everything we thought we knew about Bond is wrong.

SpoilerMoneypenny is the one who secretly recruited Bond to the double oh department, specifically to perpetrate violence and mayhem in this world so as to serve Cthulhu. then she clouded his mind so he will never suspect his true mission, and hides in plain site as his puppet-boss's "secretary"

story 3: Red Indians, Richard Lee Beyers
a sequel to Casino Royale, before Bond has his plastic surgery, also featuring Mathis. Bond picks an extremely violent fight with a sadistic pimp to test his martial arts skills. The villain has a very disturbing surgery/vivisection fetish which he indulges in a secret room in his bordello (which could suggest philosophical questions about Bond's motives in picking his own victim/test subject, but this is not explored).

story 4: the Gladiator Lie, Kelly Robson
an alternate timeline sequel to From Russia With Love, in which Tatiana has kidnapped Bond and transported him to an all-lesbian fur-farm in Siberia. There Rosa Klebb and Stalin's illegitimate daughter keep Bond unconscious in a permanent dream state, which others may share if they take the right drugs.  Bond dreams about perpetual  gladiatorial combat. All very Matrix-y/Inception-y. The story is from Tatiana's point of view, and is mostly about her concerns with lesbianism and the USSR. Bond only gets a paragraph of dreamworld content once every couple of pages, otherwise he is merely present as an unconscious body in the room. Considering this is the longest story so far, that's not a lotta actual Bond content.

story 5: Half the Sky, E. L. Chen
a sequel to Dr No, in which we learn Sister Rose was the true power behind the evil Doctor (a minor revelation after what we've already learned about Moneypenny). Despite the feminist moral, this is a fairly traditional Bond story structure, complete with lifeboat ending (hey, that trope is from the films!)
This story happens five years after the events of Dr No, and SPECTRE is mentioned, so should be approx. 1961. Thus it is actually told out of chronological sequence. (As a continuity geek, I'm watching these things!)

story 6: In Havana, Jeffrey Ford
set in 1958, during the latter days of the Cuban revolution. (but it's not the Unseen Mission referenced in Quantum of Solace, so Bond must have been sent to Cuba at least twice that year). Bond is assigned to recover an experimental berserker drug and accidentally gets dosed himself. When this story's grotesque villain is first described to Bond, there is a bit of metafictional discussion of Dick Tracy, who fought a never ending cast of physical grotesques (did Fleming read Dick Tracy? we know Batman's Bob Kane did). There is also discussion about the good honest days of British Empire vs the covert imperialism of the CIA, which I think is meant to be ironically undermined by Bond's actions under the influence of the berserker drug and M' s pragmatic response (at least he saved the world).


The stories obviously contradict each other, which is part of the fun. And some of them could fit seamlessly into Fleming's timeline! I actually like some of the radical revisionings, and don't mind the feminist or anti-imperialist interpretations (that said, Bond should be more than just an unconscious body in the room).
What does bother me is so many of the authors see Bond as nothing more than a bloodthirsty killing machine, who accepts a paycheck for what he would choose to do anyway. Fleming's Bond resented the dirty damn business, and took pride in the fact he never killed in cold blood. This book is supposed to be about Fleming's Bond, and most of the authors give evidence of knowing the books well, so why do they keep misrepresenting the violence?

I will say that these weird stories are more persuasively about Fleming's Bond than many of the more recent continuation novels (such as Solo and Devil May Care), and dare I say, the Craig movies.

Last edited by caractacus potts (16th Jun 2019 00:31)

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caractacus potts wrote:

Licence Expired: The Unauthorized James Bond...The afterword by editor Madeline Ashby tells us of her "evil social justice agenda".

I'm glad you read this so I don't have to!


(did Fleming read Dick Tracy? we know Batman's Bob Kane did)

Dick Tracy is mentioned in "For Your Eyes Only" and possibly elsewhere. The strip was syndicated outside the US, so Fleming could have easily read it.

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revelator wrote:

I'm glad you read this so I don't have to!

Always pleased to make these sort of sacrifices, sir.
I think there are 13 more stories in the book (they are all very short), so shall post more summaries as I get further along. There may yet be a hidden gem in there even you would like!

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I had a chance to read one more this morning

story 7: Mastering the Art of French Killing, Michael Skeet
Set round the time of the Suez Crisis (so 1956? this one is also out of order).
This adventure takes place in the restaurants and markets of Paris, and at least 50% of the text is sensuous descriptions of cooking, serving and eating fine French food, as well as the texture of history: decadent neighbourhoods of 17th century architecture, and the political significance of men's moustache styles.
This is a very tactile story, and I think succeeds in capturing why we want to be Bond, instead of focussing on the disturbing violence as most of the other writers have done.
M is written much as Bernard Lee played him, and there is an appearance by Q who also behaves as he did in the films.

Spoilerthe villain's evil plan is to invent the microwave oven and frozen foods, which will lead to the downfall of civilization as we know it

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So, the villain finally won!

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interesting

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I was given "my word is my bond" the Roger Moore autobiography for fathers day.

It was either that.....or the priesthood

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a few more from Licence Expired: The Unauthorized James Bond
warning, these all contain Spoilers


story 8: A Dirty Business, Ian McLaughlin
Bond is sent to an island off the coast of Venezuala, to assassinate an old schoolchum from Eton accused of selling secrets to Moscow. But Bond is being played as a patsy by the CIA who wish to consolidate control in the region.
A straightforward adventure, referencing wellknown CIA activities in the region.
I could find no clue where this would fit in the timeline.

story 9: Sorrow's Spy, Catherine McLeod
The shortest story in the book.
Bond attends another dinner party, interrupted by the investigation into the death of a known arms dealer Bond was last seen speaking to. There's a twist ending with the open-ended but strongly implied identity of the killer.
McLeod's bio says Dr No was the first book ever the author read as a child, but in tackling a short story she combines elements of the two oddball entries from FYEO, so she knows her stuff.
Takes place mid Cuban Revolution, so ~1958. (meaning Bond attended two dinner parties that year!)

story 10: Mosaic, Karl Shroeder
Bond witnesses a British A-bomb test off the NW coast of Australia, from Bruce Banner style distance. He is there because two scientists have been killed, and crucial scientific information seems to be being withheld.
Reference is made to Godzilla (1954).
Bond is accompanied by Adina, a former child soldier from Abyssinia, who has combat skills and PTSD. The experience of an A-bomb explosion by someone with PTSD is the most powerful image in the story, but could be explored much deeper.
(these pages made me extra glad I recently watched episode 8 of Twin Peaks The Return, which comes closest of anything to showing such an explosion in real time).
Adina's biographical information (she left Abyssinia 1941 and this is 15 years later) tells us this happens 1956.

story 11: The Spy Who Remembered Me, James Alan Gardner
Most surprising of all (except maybe Tatiana's czarist ambitions, see story 4, but that was too fantastic to be believed).
An older Bond is in the mideast to extract a fellow double-oh following the assassination of the country's leader.
The other double-oh is Vivienne Michel!!!. Which sort of makes sense, if you consider the fatherly advice the local policeman tried to give her in the last chapter of tSWLM and her too-cool dismissive response before speeding away on the Vespa.
And she is the only significant Canadian character in Fleming's canon, so she certainly deserves a spot in this Canadian collection.
As they are both ten years older, this take place approx 1970, the furthest ahead in the timeline yet.


I must comment, a few of these stories reveal "the Americans" as the villain. Canadians tend to identify themselves as "not Americans" (Ontario having been settled by Loyalist refugees and all that) and a lot of my fashionable downtown yuppie friends blame "the Americans" for everything. This trendy antiAmericanism would especially apply to literary types, so that could explain the frequent recurrance of American villains in this book. Sorry bout that, neighbours to the south.
I just want to say, personally, two of the best runs of luck in my life came while living in the States, and I know where much of the film and music I love comes from and appreciate the country that produced all that.

Last edited by caractacus potts (27th Jul 2019 14:58)

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My library was having a 50-cent sale on books and I picked up Between Silk and Cyanide: A Codemaker's War 1941-1945 by Leo Marks.

A memoir of his time as a codemaker for the SOE during WW2. I'm just starting it, but it starts where he determines that the current method of code making by field agents was too easy to crack and is now fighting for the SOE to implement a better cryptographic method with one-time-use codes.

The terminology, departments, and people and their titles really have reminded me of James Bond so I wanted to share here.