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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Napoleon Plural wrote:

A Hard Day's Night

yeh that's my favourite one prior to Rubber Soul, and one folks generally don't know about, assuming those first five albums were all simplistic teenybopper pop. A Hard Day's Night was a major step forward in songwriting and instrumentation. My favourite track is "If I Fell".

It's all Lennon and McCartney, no covers perhaps because it was a movie soundtrack and they wanted to maximise profits. Ringo doesn't sing at all, possibly a bonus, as it often feels like they're just trying to do him a favour. Unusually, this LP has the singles of the day on it AND the B-sides such as "You Can't Do That" and "Things We Said Today".

The EP Long Tall Sally is basically the non-lp single directly associated with the album in this case. I think those four songs on the EP all came from the same recording sessions and the artwork features the same font. Ringo sings the cover toon "Matchbox" on that EP, so maybe his usual vocal spot got shuffled onto the EP when they realised they had enough new Lennon-McCartney originals to fill a whole album. George sings "Happy Just to Dance with You", they would sometimes give him a weaker Lennon-McCartney toon to sing instead of a cover version, on the albums before he started writing his own material.

Also it's not just all Lennon-McCartney. It is almost entirely Lennon toons, I thing Paul wrote at most three and John wrote all the rest. John was at his creative peak at this time, way earlier than the albums generally considered cool to listen to, and I think this is the most Lennon-dominant album.

Help! also included two singles on the album, I think because aHDN and Help!were both soundtrack albums someone felt the expected hits heard in the movie ought to be on the official soundtrack (also in both cases the first single was the title track of the movie, so it'd be strange to leave it off). But in the case of the two Help! singles, they each had non-lp exclusive b-sides: "I'm Down" and "Yes It Is".
Otherwise, typically each British album had a corresponding non-lp single derived from the same recording sessions, it's a fun game to figure out which single corresponds to which album.

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Picked up the Deluxe 50th Anniversary Edition (4 LPs) of “The Beatles” (White Album) - the Giles Martin-remastered stereo version, and the famous acoustic Escher ‘demo sessions.’ I’ve heard the latter, which is great listening, and am looking forward to the former...should be a nice compliment to my mono edition  ajb007/martini

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Not to disregard Loeff's White Album post, but I've been meaning to respond to c potts.

The journalist Maureen Cleeve is one to thank re the song A Hard Day's Night, as Lennon's original line went: 'But when I get home to you / I find my tiredness is through' and Ms Cleeve pointed out it was a bit of a weak line, and suggested instead 'I find the things that you do' which is a much sharper, sexier line.

It's a bit like the edit Lennon did on Macca's I Saw Her Standing There, which originally went 'Well she was just seventeen / Never been a beauty queen'.

Sadly Cleeve wasn't there to sit in on Lennon's other songs on the album, namely the awful line 'I'm gonna love her til the cows come home' on When I Get Home, and it's hard not to snigger when you hear him sing 'I've got a big surprise' on the closing track.

That said, hearing all this in mono on the yellow Parlophone label (the original, not the recent reissues) none of this matters of course, as it all sounds so brilliant.

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

I'll now discuss the mono version of Revolver.

https://i.postimg.cc/8jxwMppm/cover-1619972009.jpg

Generally I'd say most of the early Beatles LPs are best in mono, as they were meant to be heard, with Beatles for Sale and Help! being possible exceptions.

I got Please Please Me, the original mono, and it sounds great, really vibrant and bracing and loud, unlike the recent remastered edition on 180g don't you know, I mean really it just doesn't do it for me at all, it's like mogadon.

That said, it is winter now and that harder, more brittle and darker sound maybe works better for this time of year. Beatles LPs did come out in winter quite a lot, I think. On my original LP - and this is the yellow Parlophone label, vinyl of course - it might be that some songs are prettier on stereo, such as Ask Me Why, and the backing vocals by George on Do You Want to Know a Secret and Anna sound a bit slurry and distracting.

Now, this darker mono sound works well with Revolver's monochrome design. Taxman works well, it's rockier and messier and angrier, which helps distract from its rather routine melody. The stereo version is daft, really bad with rhythm section in one speaker and vocals in another. Now, Eleanor Rigby really has an awful stereo vocal jump early on, which you don't get on the mono (the best stereo version might be on the Yellow Submarine Songbook album). Aside from that, the mono is darker and quite gripping, almost apocolyptic. The stereo one is a bit George Martin doing a nice orchestral arrangement, it's a bit Pepperland. It's the same song, same arrangment, but it's far less cosy on the mono.

Another one that benefits is Here, There and Everywhere - it's a bit tighter and cooler, the electric guitar backing comes through better.
But otherwise, you could argue Revolver is a summer record and in the book Shout! the author does a great paragraph about how it summed up the summer of 66. And stereo does make for a lighter, more shimmering sound, it's a summer sound imo. So I'm Only Sleeping and Good Day Sunshine might be better in stereo and the whole thing might be more expansive.

I'm afraid George's other songs sound quite dirgelike in mono and might be better in the other format. Part of me thinks, they could have put on Paperback Writer instead but of course his Indian thing did add another perspective.

Maybe the true Beatle fan could have 2 versions of Revolver, one for winter and one for summer!   ajb007/biggrin

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Just me then...

https://i.postimg.cc/Dm4KCqZ1/download.jpg

I listened to the CD of this brilliant and quirky Who album which is not quite a concept album. It is spotted with spoof pirate radio jingles and ads of the day and such stuff, before plunging into a new song. It works really well, the jingles set up the new song really well and it flows great.

But should I get the album on vinyl? You do the research and it seems some like it in mono, others say the psychedelic era is better in stereo. Another says the American single of I Can See for Miles knocks all the others into a cocked hat. Most agree that one track on the mono has an awful bit of mixing or jump cut, but another says a later pressing rectifies this.

Give a man a choice and you give him a dilemma.   ajb007/frown

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Napoleon Plural wrote:

Just me then...

https://i.postimg.cc/Dm4KCqZ1/download.jpg

I listened to the CD of this brilliant and quirky Who album which is not quite a concept album. It is spotted with spoof pirate radio jingles and ads of the day and such stuff, before plunging into a new song. It works really well, the jingles set up the new song really well and it flows great.

But should I get the album on vinyl? You do the research and it seems some like it in mono, others say the psychedelic era is better in stereo. Another says the American single of I Can See for Miles knocks all the others into a cocked hat. Most agree that one track on the mono has an awful bit of mixing or jump cut, but another says a later pressing rectifies this.

Give a man a choice and you give him a dilemma.   ajb007/frown

I have the vinyl. I think you should get it  ajb007/cheers

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Ah, but which one? Mono or stereo?

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Mine is stereo. Got it for a very friendly price, so I didn’t quarrel.

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

On a Bond-related note, I've recently (finally!) begun acquiring the original Connery Bond soundtracks on vinyl - all old, vintage copies - DN in stereo, FRWL and GF in mono(!), TB, YOLT, and DAF all in stereo. What a blast.

P.S. Got OHMSS in stereo as well.

They (literally) really don't make 'em like that anymore  ajb007/bond

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Ah... there was a compilation I was going to recommend for you and never got round to it.   ajb007/crap
https://i.postimg.cc/MvJnwfTD/download.jpg

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Napoleon Plural wrote:

Ah... there was a compilation I was going to recommend for you and never got round to it.   ajb007/crap
https://i.postimg.cc/MvJnwfTD/download.jpg

There is a vinyl release out there with the first 13 theme songs on it that I used to have...and might again - it's handy to have all of the main title themes in one place. Alas, I don't see any double- or triple-LP compendiums available with the full run. I'm sure they'll do it at some point.

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

287

Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

I picked up Barry's soundtrack to Out of Africa on vinyl.

Now, the theme to Out of Africa is famously brilliant and imo should have been released as a single, just as you come across second-hand singles of Lawrence of Arabia from back in the day. Then again, maybe not because the single of Chariots of Fire didn't dent the top 10 on its release, and that was a massive film. Out of Africa wasn't a massive hit.

It appears that John Barry agreed with my assessment of the theme, as it features no less than three times on his soundtrack. It's an LP with a wide areola around the central nipple - that's the area where there is no music, the equivalent of a wide margin on a Word document, but I prefer the nipple/areola analogy myself.
Another theme sounds a bit like Moonlight in Vermont, which is also duplicated in various forms. Another will have you going 'You Only Live Twice' 10 seconds in. One bit of music is by Mozart, which may be in the film I guess, but is a bit of a swizz, especially as one who bought the Moonraker soundtrack as a kid and expected to hear the classical bit accompanying the jokey gondola ride.
Ironically Moonraker had cues to spare, which never made it on to any soundtrack, even the remastered extended CD, due to copyright reasons I understand.

The Out of Africa soundtrack is just the wrongside of soporific to me. Maybe the film needed a change of pace, a dogfight or something, to allow Barry to liven things up! An album like Moonraker is streets ahead, but the film was not Oscar-worthy, as Barry more or less pointed out when he explained why some of his scores won Oscars and others didn't.

I also picked up Barry's Cotton Club soundtrack from a local tat shop. Maybe I am in the wrong mood, but while this 1920s homage is lively, it's a bit thin sounding and anaemic. It's generic 1920s flapper music, or at least side 1 is, and would sound better in mono and on a 78. Some mid-80s vinyl cheats you out of the big experience.

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Sticking with The Cotton Club, it seems that Barry only wrote two tracks for the album. The rest are reworkings of classic tracks by Duke Ellington et al. Barry produced the album, but oddly I understood that Richard Gere had insisted he play the coronet for the film, but he's not on the music credits at all.

It would make a pretty good companion piece with The Untouchables which came out later in the decade. Really, one misses those Geoff Love type compilation albums, you could have a double album of 1980s soundtrack music, with one side consisting of Out of Africa, Chariots of Fire, Cotton Club and Untouchables cues, another side sci-fi stuff.

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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Re: Why I Love Collecting Vinyl (Records)

Now I'll break ranks and explain what I don't like about vinyl records.

I've yet to get a good version of the Beatles single Paperback Writer. It just sounds a bit discordant (to be fair, the harmonies aren't Who standard). In fact, few of my Beatles singles really pass muster. Reasons may be because production values weren't so good back then, it seems to me most 70s singles sound better all things being equal. Abba's production was great, v thorough because of advances. Not saying Abba were better than the Beatles, but some of their songs or rather records sound better.

It reminds me of an argument I had in the early 1980s when I said that modern records were only better because of the technological advances. 'Yeah, that's why they're better' the other guy replied, and he had a point.

60s records may also sound worse because they're older and got played more, plus they got bought by teens who could not afford much because of pocket money restrictions, so those few records got played more and worn out.

Also, 'modern' songs like the Kaiser Chiefs or the Killers - I bought the singles and they sound horrible really. Like someone took the digital track and just pressed it on vinyl, which is likely what happened. On the other hand, Supertramp's Logical Song, which is not a great song imo, sounds great on vinyl.
You might argue this was done deliberately to make CDs and digital sound better, the idea being you run down the competition, that is run down one sector to enhance the other - a bit like what's happening to the NHS to benefit the private sector.
I won't be getting any more singles from bands in the early Noughties, no matter how good the song. And the same applies to these modern vinyl reissues, even if they say it's 180g, they just don't sound right to me. Wish that they did.

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017

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my understanding:
rock/pop singles in the 1960s were aimed at teenagers who mostly listened to the music on transistor radios, car radios, juke boxes, or portable record players. So they were engineered to sound punchy on those types of systems, not hifi stereos.

The parents was more likely to have a quality hifi stereo upstairs in the living room, and there was a whole separate set of music available for the parents: Sinatra, broadway cast recordings, exotica ... those types of records, marketed to parents in the early/mid60s, are more likely to have what we consider good sound than the rock/pop aimed at the kids.
The original Casino Royale soundtrack, for example, is considered to have great sound quality, and that Burt Bacharach music wasn't aimed at the kids.

It wasn't til the late 60s that the kids themselves were more likely to be listening to their records on quality equipment. Why the White Album was the first Beatles album to start with a dedicated stereo mix, instead of the format being an afterthought.

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That's an excellent and evocative reply. Makes sense. Mind you, some early singles sound good anyway - Everley Brothers, for instance.
Ticket To Ride sounds good, as does Hello Goodbye B side I am the Walrus; in mono it's quite dark and punky.
Certainly the Sinatra Capital albums that preceded all that sound much better.

When reissuing and remastering the Beatles albums they tweaked them a bit most likely for the reasons you've given - but the Please Please Me mono remastered I paid out for is unlistenable to me, so I play the battered one I got off eBay, which is a bit brittle but rocks.
Thing is, does it mean I should get a Dansette to listen to those old Beatle singles? It's all a bit much.

"This is where we leave you Mr Bond."

Roger Moore 1927-2017