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Topic: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

I've been listening to What's the Score podcast for a while now, and if you haven't come across it before the format of the show has the host Frank R. Wilson interviewing a guest who discusses and plays a number of selected cues from film scores that they particularly like. This podcast has been of particular interest as a Bond music fan because the host is a huge Barry fan and tends to play a lot of his music for Bond and other films and even shared an interview that he conducted with Barry many years ago. Also, a number of his guests are also big Bond fans and have included Terry Bamber, Warren Ringham, Joe Darlington and our good friend David Zartisky. The latest episode features another old friend of ours - who hasn't been seen around here for a few years - but I'm sure many AJB members will remember The Cat. On this episode his music selections are largely based on the music as heard in the film, rather than what is presented on the soundtrack albums. I enjoyed the discussion and the music, and I would recommend other Bond music fans to check it out: https://whatsthescore1.podbean.com/e/gu … ely-hubai/

Also worth checking out is one of his older episodes where Frank Wilson interviewed John Altman and got the story behind Altman's work on the Goldeneye score, and also included the full recording of the re-scored tank chase music.

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Re: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

Thanks, Golrush007, I'll try to check that out. Sounds interesting.
I'm still in occasional contact with The Cat on Facebook- in fact, BBC's "The Film Program" mentioned him recently (they were plugging his book) and he was delighted when I told him.

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Re: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

It's an excellent podcast! I've also been a guest!

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Re: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

Matt S wrote:

It's an excellent podcast! I've also been a guest!

I'll be sure to listen to your episode Matt S, I haven't done so yet.

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Re: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

Warren Ringham was also interviewed there as well.

Matt, I haven't heard your interview but I'm looking forward to it. You've got some great insight into film scores.

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Re: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

I've just listened to Matt S's episode on What's the Score and I found the selections most enjoyable. When the episode opened up with 'The Sniper Was a Woman' from The Living Daylights I knew I was in safe hands. That's always been a favourite cue of mine.

I enjoyed the cue from Spartacus, and I think I will have to rewatch that film sometime soon. I've watched it once, about 10 years ago and disgracefully it was on a laptop screen. And I've also never listened to the score on its own.

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Re: What's the Score - film music podcast featuring an old friend of ours

Golrush007 wrote:

I've just listened to Matt S's episode on What's the Score and I found the selections most enjoyable. When the episode opened up with 'The Sniper Was a Woman' from The Living Daylights I knew I was in safe hands. That's always been a favourite cue of mine.

I enjoyed the cue from Spartacus, and I think I will have to rewatch that film sometime soon. I've watched it once, about 10 years ago and disgracefully it was on a laptop screen. And I've also never listened to the score on its own.

Thanks! I tried to chose a wide variety of different styles of music that I like. I think Spartacus is one of the greatest scores of all time. The score on its own may be a bit intense, and it's overall very far from the lyricism of John Barry (though the iconic love theme is one of the most lyrical pieces of film music ever written). Barry approaches most cues in the same way he's write a song, while North is developing motifs throughout a score in the most intricate manner. Watch the film again before going straight to the score unless you are a big fan of 20th century classical music.