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Re: Last Book Read...

Moonraker 10 wrote:

"Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte

ajb007/mad

For school....

The " ajb007/mad " is probably because you read it for school.  Jane Eyre is a great novel; it's one that can best be appreciated when it isn't being shoved down your throat.

Vox clamantis in deserto

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Re: Last Book Read...

Walden Two by famous psychologist B.F. Skinner envisages a utopian society designed by principles of behavioral engineering.  Few details are given as to the actual implementation of the intervention design; the book focuses mostly on the philosophical issues of behavior modification and its effects on politics and human nature.  The book sparked controversy over Skinner's assertion that there is no such thing as free will; freedom in his utopian society was freedom from aversive control, better known as punishment.  The individual's actions are dictated by various influences from the external environment.

The ideas presented certainly are thought-provoking but the writing itself isn't brilliant by any means.  After graduating from college, Skinner found little success as a novelist because he focused on objective, scientific writing and went to law school to appease his father about his job prospects as a writer.  Surprisingly enough, he was good friends with poet Robert Frost!

Flattery will get you nowhere, but don't stop trying.

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I read Casino Royale and am almost done with LALD. Whoopee!

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Re: Last Book Read...

SiameseFightingFish wrote:

Just this day, I finished reading Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. I'll just say this: if the entire book was true, it pretty much screws up any galactic theory cooked up by astronomists gazing endlessly at the Moon in their observatories! ajb007/biggrin

And the theory contributing to the fact that there are parallel universes outside our own... it makes our planet feel VERY small, doesn't it? Compare a fingernail, for example, to the entire human body, and we have our galaxy the Milky Way.

When you think how far everything extends, it just makes your brain explode.

Sounds like you're anticipating the 2nd book of the 5-book trilogy ajb007/lol  Supposedly the ultimate form of torture is to see how tiny and significant you are in the universe.

Flattery will get you nowhere, but don't stop trying.

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Re: Last Book Read...

The Chosen, by Chaim Potok. It's for Honors English, but I enjoyed it a lot. I am currently reading Cold Sassy Tree by Olive Ann Burns. It's also for school, but I like it, not as much as the former though.

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SPECTRENumber1 wrote:

The Chosen, by Chaim Potok. It's for Honors English, but I enjoyed it a lot. I am currently reading Cold Sassy Tree by Olive Ann Burns. It's also for school, but I like it, not as much as the former though.

I HATED the Chosen. I read it for English class this year (eighth grade), and I abhorred it.

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Garden of Beasts by Jeffery Deaver. It's a period piece, being set in pre-WWII Germany. A decent enough read, but not as enjoyable as Deaver's Lincoln Rhymes novels.

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Finally finished The Codex by Douglas Preston

About a questionable art and antiquities collector who buries himself with his treasure and leaves his heirs to go searching for it. It was meant to be an enjoyable quick summer read, but I found it incredibly boring. Nice idea, but poorly executed IMO.

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Bernard Herrmann's Vertigo: A Film Score Handbook is possibly one of the most difficult things I've ever read short of Madeline Albright's autobiography.  Well, to be honest, I only managed to get through the first 14 chapters of the latter before I realized that I was getting way in over my head about American foreign policy.  Yet despite my total lack of knowledge on music theory and musicology, I really enjoyed reading about all of Vertigo's influences from Herrmann's earlier works as well as various other Romantic composers.  I also loved the various holograph score reprints which I've been wanting to find for ages now.  There's actually not as much analysis about how certain thematic shifts and changes in orchestration contribute to the meaning of the film itself as I had expected to be, though.

Still, it's a definite must-read for Herrmann buffs.

Flattery will get you nowhere, but don't stop trying.

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Re-read Lieutenant Hornblower, The second book chronologically in C.S. Forester's Horatio Hornblower series. None of the Hornblower books are dissappointing, and Forester does an excellent job of bridging the history of his famous character in the early books. An interesting literary perspective about this book is that, while the book is about Hornblower, it follows primarily the thoughts and actions of Hornblower's shipmate Lieutenant Bush, leaving the reader never quite able to get into the protaganist's head. Quite well done!

Last edited by darenhat (11th Sep 2005 16:54)

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Been re-reading many things, mostly early 20th century shorts in the Nameless Cults, horror vein.

From the Weird Tales circle, Clark Ashton Smith, E. Hoffman Price, HP Lovecraft (naturally) Robert Bloch, etc.

Now I gotta get my hands on a first edition copy of the Necronomicon. However the mad Abdul Alhazred wasn't specific in where to obtain editions.

Last edited by Alex (12th Sep 2005 04:50)

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I've just started a book by Dean Koontz called "The Taking", I hoping its going to be as good as his other novels.

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Finally read The Power of One after having purchased it about 15 years ago. Certainly a rich, colorful account of life in South Africa during the war, but I was a bit dismayed of the overall story. Even as a child, the central character was a bit too perfect, despite everything going on around him. I would have related a bit more if the character showed some failures in his attempts to apply his perspective on the world and social system that he was in.

Last edited by darenhat (10th Nov 2005 02:17)

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Re: Last Book Read...

At Risk by Stella Rimington, the former head of MI5. It's brilliant. Fast paced, plenty of twists and a great protagonist, Liz Carlyle. I would recommend this book to anyone.

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"Absolute Power", by David Baldacci. Not bad, but the film was better.

66

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The Tesseract by Alex Garland - I really like this book -although it wasn't as popular as The Beach.

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The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

(Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

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NAOMI_FAN 1 wrote:

The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

(Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

Would you happen to be an Ice Station Zebra fan of the same author? ajb007/biggrin

Flattery will get you nowhere, but don't stop trying.

69

Re: Last Book Read...

Hardyboy wrote:
Moonraker 10 wrote:

"Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Bronte

ajb007/mad

For school....

The " ajb007/mad " is probably because you read it for school.  Jane Eyre is a great novel; it's one that can best be appreciated when it isn't being shoved down your throat.


How true. After paddling in the shallows of contemporary fiction for a few years after my schooling, I discovered Orwell, then back-tracked through many of those same authors I'd previously found 'challenging': Austen, Bronte, Forster et al. With the scales removed from my eyes I was able to discover a much greater depth than I'd thought possible.

I seem to spend a lot of time re-reading books I enjoyed in my youth - something I said I'd never do. A fruitless attempt to recapture a lost innocence?
Appropriately, this year I've revisited Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh - no doubt familiar to many of you through the marvellous television adaptation. It's a wonderfully evocative book with decay and loss of innocence as it's central themes.

I was going to list others I've dipped into this year, but perhaps I'll save those for another time.

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Yea I had to read Jane Eyre for school last year. It was such a boring read to me that I ended up not finishing the book for the final test. The plot is rather boring in the beginning, but it does pick up towards the end. I found myself amazed by the book's most bizare twist however. I guess it depends on the reader, but I often find that the books considered "classics" are the most putrid pieces of literature. I'm definitely not a reader. Give me a television any day.

P.S. The best thing that ever happened to the Jane Eyre story was casting Timothy Dalton as Rochester in its playwright adaptation. ajb007/smile

"My acting range? Left eyebrow raised, right eyebrow raised..."

-Roger Moore

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Re: Last Book Read...

Tee Hee wrote:

I often find that the books considered "classics" are the most putrid pieces of literature. I'm definitely not a reader. Give me a television any day.


That's an interesting point of view.
Would you care to elaborate?

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Re: Last Book Read...

I just finished reading "Future Noir:  The Making of Blade Runner."  I've owned this book for about 8 years but have only read isolated portions.  Finally, I managed to read everything, begining with the acknowlegements and ending with the appendix section.  I find fascinating how this one movie underwent a saga of development begining with a popular sci-fi novel written during the socially conscious 60's, then to the struggles to get it on screen, the box-office failure it endured, and culminating in it's vindication as a profound work of art in its growing following and the 2nd theatrical release a decade after.  I recommend this book not just to fans of the movie, but for anyone who has an interest in the film-making process as it explores the artistic as well as business aspects of movie production, marketing, and managing a host of diverse contributors of talent.

I received in the mail just this week another BR book, entitled, "Retrofitting Blade Runner," which is a collection of essays that explore the different social and philosophical aspects of the film and the book it's based on, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" written by Philip K. Dick.

I'm not really a big sci-fi fan beyond the pedestrian consumption of the Star Wars and Matrix movies, but I fell in love with Blade Runner when it came out in 1982, and despite its poor box office performance, I watched it 8 times within a span of 6 weeks since it opened.  Its director, Ridley Scott set out to de-emphasize action (the action film format that we're familiar with today was just begining to be defined during that time) and compensate by creating "visual depth" in every shot, to the frustration of those involved, including Harrison Ford and the studio.  That is why books such as the ones mentioned serve to unlock the film's tiniest nuances that open up to intriguing concepts that were purposely infused therin, which of course would go unnoticed in a casual viewing.

Last edited by superado (16th Nov 2005 18:18)

"...the purposeful slant of his striding figure looked dangerous, as if he was making quickly for something bad that was happening further down the street." -SMERSH on 007 dossier photo, Ch. 6 FRWL.....

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Re: Last Book Read...

Tracy wrote:
NAOMI_FAN 1 wrote:

The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

(Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

Would you happen to be an Ice Station Zebra fan of the same author? ajb007/biggrin

Yes! I love everything by Maclean! i really think his stuff is brilliant!

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Re: Last Book Read...

NAOMI_FAN 1 wrote:
Tracy wrote:
NAOMI_FAN 1 wrote:

The Golden Gate, by Alistair Maclean! I read this book at least once a year!

(Yes.........it's THAT good!!)

Would you happen to be an Ice Station Zebra fan of the same author? ajb007/biggrin

Yes! I love everything by Maclean! i really think his stuff is brilliant!

I haven't read all of Maclean's novels but I have read Ice Station Zebra.  It's an outstanding book with great atmosphere.

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Bullitt68, you MUST read The Golden Gate! If you enjoyed Ice Station Zebra, you will enjoy this book as well!