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Topic: Halloween

I know there are other threads existing on Halloween. But I decided to make this one for us all to comment on whether we enjoy Halloween, whether we do anything for it and things like that.

Personally I think I'm a bit old for trick or treating and haven't been for a few years now and shall only probably go again when it's with kids of my own.
Sometimes I go to parties or have a few friends round to watch 'scary' movies.
I think Halloween is alright and I enjoy it mostly as I'm not usually disturbed be trick or treaters beyond 8pm.
The only thing that annoys me about the holiday is when we hear about yobs going round ruining the fun. Like on the news this morning I heard about some lads in Liverpool bricking a bus. I don't think you really need to go round doing such things to enjoy Halloween and really parents should do more to stop their children going out if they're going to do things like that. Their parents shouldn't accept as I know if my parents knew I'd ever done anything like that then they'd completely hit the roof.

Relax darling, I'm on top of the situation ajb007/martini

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Re: Halloween

I am writing this with the curtains around my front door pulled tight and the car safely locked in the garage.  I hate hate hate trick or treating; it's flat out extortion, if you ask me.  Knocking on someone's door and demanding some kind of reward, otherwise you'll cause them or their home damage?  Any other night of the year that sort of behaviour would get you an ASBO, and rightly so.

What's worse is the examples like you mentioned, Felix, where someone takes advantage of "halloween hi-jinks" to cause an act of flat out vandalism and violence.  No excuse.

Plus I don't like the way that Halloween rubs up against and in some ways overshadows Bonfire Night, which is a traditional event in this country and not something that's been imported from abroad to try and flog more chocolate; I don't like being unable to shop in Tesco's without being accosted by checkout staff dressed as Bela Lugosi; and I also can't stand the way that it now seems to be spelt Halloween instead of Hallowe'en because apostrophes are now considered the tools of the mad for a large portion of the country.

Jesus I'm a miserable sod.

Founder of the Wint & Kidd Appreciation Society.

@merseytart

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Re: Halloween

Here here!

I dont like the "holiday."  Its so un needed, and so American.  It feels out of place down here (its near summer, and pretty hot atm - not what i when i want to wear a costume.)  Only one personwas brave enough to ring our doorbell.  And they were with their dads, so i doubt that they would have done anything if we didnt give them anything.

A funny side story is that the local supermarket refused to sell eggs to minors, as a result they were rung up and told that they were going to be egged.  Ahhh, the circle of life.

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Re: Halloween

taity wrote:

A funny side story is that the local supermarket refused to sell eggs to minors, as a result they were rung up and told that they were going to be egged.  Ahhh, the circle of life.

I work for a grocery store. Our manager tells us not to be afraid to refuse to sell eggs to minors. It usually isn't a problem. Minors don't come through with eggs.

As for the holiday. I don't like Halloween. I agree, kids shouldn't be out begging for candy. If they want to go out trick or treating they should go out with the orange UNICEF boxes and do something good for someone else.

Some people would complain even if you hang them with a new rope

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Re: Halloween

I'll defend Halloween. 

Where I live, it's far from extortion; if one doesn't wish to participate, he turns off his front porch light, and is left alone.  No big deal; no property damage, no lawlessness.

I'm the father of two boys, now aged 11 (nearly) and 8.  We make a lap of the neighborhood (a couple of blocks of middle-class suburban houses), they go to the houses who enjoy the event, and get a couple of pieces of candy from each.  They get to dress up, play make-believe and get a few treats.  No harm, no foul.  Dad comes along with a flashlight, for traffic control ajb007/cool

Then, when we've finished, we come home and watch a classic monster movie (tonight it's "Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein")  ajb007/biggrin

Last edited by Loeffelholz (1st Nov 2006 05:35)

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Halloween

Jeez, what a crowd of sourpusses.  You guys need to lighten up.

I just got back from trick-or-treating with my 7-year-old daughter (who was a 50's bobby sox girl).  We had a wonderful time and exchanged pleasantries with all our neighbors who were in their homes or out with their own kids.  She collected a small bagful of candy, much of which we will donate to a local youth organization.

Yes, some of the older kids engage in mild hooliganism -- usually involving eggs or shaving cream -- but no real harm is done.

Halloween is fun for the kids -- period.  And if I was a poor enough role model to allow one night of candy-gathering to somehow lessen my children's morals, then I have no business having kids in the first place.

Hilly...you old devil!

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Re: Halloween

My oldest son went as a hippie, and my youngest went as Alice Cooper ajb007/lol  I got to do the makeup  ajb007/shifty

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Halloween

Sir Hillary Bray wrote:

Jeez, what a crowd of sourpusses.  You guys need to lighten up.

I just got back from trick-or-treating with my 7-year-old daughter (who was a 50's bobby sox girl).  We had a wonderful time and exchanged pleasantries with all our neighbors who were in their homes or out with their own kids.  She collected a small bagful of candy, much of which we will donate to a local youth organization.

Yes, some of the older kids engage in mild hooliganism -- usually involving eggs or shaving cream -- but no real harm is done.

Halloween is fun for the kids -- period.  And if I was a poor enough role model to allow one night of candy-gathering to somehow lessen my children's morals, then I have no business having kids in the first place.

I'll say they're sourpusses, Sir Hillary. They need to take a Valium or something.
Maybe times have changed since I went trick or treating or took my kid, but I never thought of it as extortion. And I never took revenge or even considered taking revenge on someone who didn't give me candy, and never knew or heard of anyone who did. In fact, I don't think that as a kid I really knew "Trick or Treat" was anything but a traditional phrase you said when someone answered the door.
Is hooliganism really that prevalent nowadays?
But I do understand that Halloween is really an import in Britain (although I gather the colonists brought it with them from the UK and elsewhere in Europe). Isn't Guy Fawkes Day somewhat similar to Halloween?
I think it's kind of funny that France now has Halloween. Didn't when I lived there.

Last edited by highhopes (1st Nov 2006 03:31)

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Re: Halloween

Nobody bothers you in my neighborhood if you decide to turn in early. It's also a nice way of melting the ice. We all helped each other during the hurricanes, and now we let the kids have a fun night, which ends relatively early anyhow.

HH!

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Re: Halloween

I'm another Hallowe'en defender.  A lot of people love to decorate their houses with kitschy ghosts and goblins, invite the kiddies inside to grab a goodie, and try to give the little ones a fun little scare.  It's all about letting kids have some fun--and it can be fun for the grownups too!  Man, life's too short to get uptight about such a minor thing. . .

Vox clamantis in deserto

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Re: Halloween

taity wrote:

Here here!

I dont like the "holiday."  Its so un needed, and so American..

Unneeded and American??? What is that supposed to mean?  Didn't Halloween originate in the United Kingdom with the Celtics and the Druids anyway?

I agree with the lighten up crowd, don't let an apostrophe or some rotten kids spoil a little spooky fun for you.

Happy Halloween everybody!
http://greetings.aolcdn.com/product/thumbs/3105170t.gif

Last edited by Monique (1st Nov 2006 04:53)

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Re: Halloween

Monique wrote:

Happy Halloween everybody!
http://greetings.aolcdn.com/product/thumbs/3105170t.gif

ajb007/cheers  ajb007/heart

"Blood & Ashes"...AVAILABLE on Amazon.co.uk: Get 'Jaded': Blood & Ashes: The Debut Oscar Jade Thriller
"I am not an entrant in the Shakespeare Stakes." - Ian Fleming
"Screw 'em." - Daniel Craig, The Best James Bond EverTM

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Re: Halloween

FelixLeiter007 wrote:

I heard about some lads in Liverpool bricking a bus.


Isn't that just like any other day in Liverpool?? ajb007/wink

I've heard on the news about the greater need for policing on Hallowe'en, that some cities have minibuses full of coppers driving round the streets keeping an eye out for ASBO kids and the like but to be honest, while that's been on national UK news, I've never heard it being a particular problem in my part of the world.  And while I can perfectly understand that not only does it ruin Hallowe'en for some, it taints it with an ugly, problematic brush.  But the kids that will cause trouble on Hallowe'en are the same kids that will hang around street corners with a bottle of cider bricking buses anyway - sure higher profile policing might be needed in some cities during Hallowe'en, but maybe if the bloody system dealt with these anti-social louts on the other 364 days of the year we might not have that problem.

Anyway...

Hallowe'en.  In Scotland it's never been a big deal in terms of decorated houses (never seen one), but it dates way back - as Mo points out it's a Celtic pagan festival - and we do get the guisers going round the houses.  It's called guising up here and the tradition is that the kids perform some sort of entertainment (song, joke, whatever) and if it's enjoyed by the host, of course it always is, they're rewarded with sweets.  There's no tradition of "trick or treat" up here.  At parties and the like, the tradition of dooking for apples (trying to grab an apple out of a bucket of water with your teeth) and retreiving, again with your teeth, a treacle-coated scone swinging on a string while blindfolded, were the games of the day.

Where I live, generaly the guisers visiting are limited to the kids from the street (all 12 of) and last night that's just who came.  Not only is it a good way to be neighbourly and build good relations with the kids (and parents) in the area, but you do get some terrific bits of gossip from their accompying folks ajb007/biggrin 

As for it eclipsing Guy Fawkes Night, it always did up here as Guy Fawkes is essentially an English celebration (post-union of crowns, pre-union of parliaments) but in the last few years - actually since the Millenium - it's become A LOT more popular up here, so much so that on Sunday night the sky will light up and the ground will shake like downtown Baghdad on Shock & Awe night - and that's just a small coastal town.

I actually read, much to my disgust, on the BBC website the other day that "Halloween celebrations in the UK were repopularised in the 1980s with influence from America".  Garbage.  Repopularised in England perhaps, but it didn't need re-energising up here from America or anyone else.  I've also heard that carved pumpkins have only become popular here in recent years due to their use in the US.  Again, garbage.  Pumpkins are far more available than they ever were, but I remember carrying out a carved turnip when I was 5 - it originated in Scotland and was shipped to America. 

As for apostrophes, that's the way I grew up spelling it, it doesn't bother me if it's used or not but, unlike jetset, I've not sold out ajb007/tongue

(A belated) Happy Hallowe'en everyone! [img=http://www.alphabetgirls.com/forums/images/smiles/VPunky.gif]

Last edited by Moonraker 5 (1st Nov 2006 10:52)

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Re: Halloween

I've noticed that most, if not all of the Halloween "defenders" in this topic are American. Forgive me, if I'm wrong.

I don't support Halloween personally, I agree that in this country it's simply an excuse for chaos. Jetset hit the nail on the head. Here in the UK, some people are too frightened even to open the doors, incase they're faced with abuse from low-life youths who have nothing better to do than terrorise their neighbours.

In many cases, not answering the door will result in having eggs thrown at your house or your car vandalised; it's a no-win situation. I have had my house egged once before (though not severely). The city of Bristol gets it pretty bad I feel.

Well, there's only one solution; fitting a flamethrower to my post box! That will be one hell of a trick or treat surprise!

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Re: Halloween

General_Ourumov wrote:

I've noticed that most, if not all of the Halloween "defenders" in this topic are American. Forgive me, if I'm wrong.

You're definitely wrong about the "if not all" part.

And once more I have to say that problem youths at Hallowe'en seems more of an English problem, certainly to the vandalism extent I've read about, so "here in the UK people are afraid to open their doors" doesn't really apply north of the border.  I've heard no one complaining about it here.

Last edited by Moonraker 5 (1st Nov 2006 13:54)

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Re: Halloween

The only apostrophe I care about is the old Frank Zappa album. And, jeez, if you don't care for the holiday, then why comment. Let the ones who celebrate enjoy one little bitty evening out of 364. You don't see me slagging off British holidays, do you?

I never knew Halloween was the end of the world. "Excuse for chaos" Gimme a break!

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Re: Halloween

Here in small isolated Melbourne, Halloween plays no part at all. I've never celebrated it and I think I've only ever had three trick or treaters come to my door. In fact I didn't even notice that it was Halloween two days ago until I saw this thread. ajb007/wink

"He’s a man way out there in the blue, riding on a smile and a shoeshine. And when they start not smiling back—that’s an earthquake. and then you get yourself a couple of spots on your hat, and you’re finished. Nobody dast blame this man. A salesman is got to dream, boy. It comes with the territory." Death of a Salesman

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Re: Halloween

Moonraker 5 wrote:
General_Ourumov wrote:

I've noticed that most, if not all of the Halloween "defenders" in this topic are American. Forgive me, if I'm wrong.

You're definitely wrong about the "if not all" part.

And once more I have to say that problem youths at Hallowe'en seems more of an English problem, certainly to the vandalism extent I've read about, so "here in the UK people are afraid to open their doors" doesn't really apply north of the border.  I've heard no one complaining about it here.

I can assure you that unfortunately it is true. There are most definitely extra patrols of police and their work load is considerably increased.

It is not pleasant when you get groups costume less teenage boys knocking at the door at 9.30 - 10.00pm saying 'trick or treat' ( which I did). No wonder the elderly in particular are scared.

For all those that accuse us of being sourpusses, I think it depends which side of the pond you are on. In the States it is a long and happy tradition that families  participate in. I know that people will leave bowls of candy on the doorstep for 'trick or treaters' if they are going out. 

It is very different here. It is just an excuse for mindless yobs to cause even more mayhem than usual which is why our shops wont sell eggs to under 18's, our police are patrolling issuing dispersal orders and many sit at home on the dark waiting for it to go away.

Last edited by Lady Rose (1st Nov 2006 14:32)

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Re: Halloween

Lady Rose wrote:

I can assure you that unfortunatley it is true. There are most definitly extra patrols of police and thier work load is considerably increased.

I'm not questionning whether it's true or not for parts of England, I'm questionning the validity of it in Scotland.  It certainly hasn't scraped the Scottish news as far as I've seen.  It's blanket misuse of the terms "UK" and "British" here I'm not keen on, particularly when Hallowe'en itself has its origins in Scotland, is an age old tradition up here and it's being billed as an "American" holiday.

Last edited by Moonraker 5 (1st Nov 2006 14:41)

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Re: Halloween

Not getting stuck into that bugbear again, are you? I'm sure not every square inch of England has increased patrols, but I doubt citizens of Kent get too worried because happenings in Yorkshire are described as 'occuring in England'.

Last edited by emtiem (1st Nov 2006 14:44)

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Re: Halloween

Moonraker 5 wrote:
Lady Rose wrote:

I can assure you that unfortunatley it is true. There are most definitly extra patrols of police and thier work load is considerably increased.

I'm not questionning whether it's true or not for parts of England, I'm questionning the validity of it in Scotland.  It certainly hasn't scraped the Scottish news as far as I've seen.  It's blanket misuse of the terms "UK" and "British" here I'm not keen on, particularly when Hallowe'en itself has its origins in Scotland, is an age old tradition up here and it's being billed as an "American" holiday.

I appreciate what you meant M5, I was really commentating on what is going on in my neck of the woods as opposed to Scotland.

It's a shame that in England Halloween has been hijacked by the mobs. I remember as a kid we didn't do 't or t' but we used to have small parties were we bobbed for apples and the like. My daughter was at a Halloween party last night, dressed as a Vampire and sticking her head in yellow jelly looking for spider shaped sweets and I think thats great and thats how it should be. I just wish we could treat it as a fun holiday like in the US instead of having to
batten down the hatches.

Last edited by Lady Rose (1st Nov 2006 14:52)

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Re: Halloween

emtiem wrote:

Not getting stuck into that bugbear again, are you?

Don't dare speak to me like that.  Yes, I am getting stuck into that "old bugbear", you know why?  BECAUSE I'M NOT ENGLISH AND SCOTLAND IS NOT A PART OF ENGLAND. Is that clear enough to get it through your ignorant skull?

How absolutely rude, condascending, offensive and completely and utterly arrogant of you.

Go read up on the Hallowe'en tradition, go rake in the Scottish news over the last few nights and see what you come up with in terms of increased policing over Hallowe'en across Scotland.  And then read up on the fact that Scotland is actually a nation, with its own laws, its own parliament, its own traditions and culture, and isn't a "region" of England like Yorkshire or Kent. 

There are at times when I hear the arguments of Scottish independence sounding rather attractive when I read such patronising, offensive arrogance.  Perhaps not so surprising that the last poll had 44% of Scots in favour of breaking up the UK.

Last edited by Moonraker 5 (1st Nov 2006 19:31)

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Re: Halloween

I think Lady Rose has opened my eyes on how rough it can get in London - I apologize for my abrupt comments earlier.

Yes, shaving cream and eggs occur here, although the last time I witnessed one was 1985 Germany, and I was a participant! (does that shock your tender souls?)

Anyway. I'm starting to realize over the last four or five years how different and seperate an entity the UK is from us.

Again, I regret my comments, and wish no ill will towards my fellow diabolics across the "pond", but I still love Halloween!! (so sue me) ajb007/biggrin

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Re: Halloween

Moonraker 5 wrote:

You're definitely wrong about the "if not all" part.

And once more I have to say that problem youths at Hallowe'en seems more of an English problem, certainly to the vandalism extent I've read about, so "here in the UK people are afraid to open their doors" doesn't really apply north of the border.  I've heard no one complaining about it here.

No need to sound so defensive, good Sir! ajb007/cheers But, up until this point, a much greater number of our American friends have displayed their love for the Halloween celebration thus far.

I'm now aware that I sounded as if I was generalising when I used the term "UK" instead of "England". But Scotland isn't 100% free of problems, simply because we don't read it in the news or see it on television (and I'm aware that's not what you're saying). It is indeed worse in England, and I'll add the good Lady Rose's points to those already listed.

Alex, considering some of the anti-social trolls that roam our streets at night, Halloween could be considered an "excuse for chaos" in some regions.

It is a great shame though. ajb007/crap

Last edited by General_Ourumov (1st Nov 2006 16:49)

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Re: Halloween

Alex wrote:

I think Lady Rose has opened my eyes on how rough it can get in London - I apologize for my abrupt comments earlier.

Yes, shaving cream and eggs occur here, although the last time I witnessed one was 1985 Germany, and I was a participant! (does that shock your tender souls?)

Anyway. I'm starting to realize over the last four or five years how different and seperate an entity the UK is from us.

Again, I regret my comments, and wish no ill will towards my fellow diabolics across the "pond", but I still love Halloween!! (so sue me) ajb007/biggrin

I'll withdraw my "sourpuss" remark, as well. I didn't realize that Halloween (or we'en) vandalism was common, at least in certain areas of England. I don't think too many American teens actually trick-or-treat, or take the phrase literally. They tend to go to parties, (where they can do things all the things they like to do in private). It's mostly harmless little kids who show up at the door.