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Ammo08 wrote:

I spent 4 years in the regular Air Force building nuclear weapons for the Minuteman III from 1972-1976. In 1986 I joined the Missouri Air National Guard at St Louis and built bombs, missiles and rockets, and strung ammo for the F-4E and F-15A fighters...In 1992 I transferred to the Tennessee Air Guard at Memphis, (my hometown) and spent 18 years working in supply and training. I retired in early 2011. I was deployed to the UK, Germany, and the Middle East...

If the good Lord would let me go around again, I would do it again...

https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-0/p206x206/1010147_10203003205866085_3552246414438883449_n.jpg?oh=2d3d2c51e11ed812fe298679d9e0eef5&oe=5908CE91  A long time ago in a city, far, far away....

As a Minuteman II EMT guy, what sort of building did you perform for LGM-30G? Did you work at Ogden?

I don't recall anyone in the Air Force being involved in manufacturing weapon systems.

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Another funny story.

When we used to do the exercises, many times these would be in the deep wilds known as the bush. One exercise which happened to all men in the regiment was that a stick of 4 men dropped into the remote bush and have to do different tasks but one task was to get a wounded comrade out of the bush on the stretcher for perhaps 60 or even 100km. At first times the wounded man was a real soldier but many times they would cheat and walk on their own but the officers knew this so the wounded man was a log that was heavy as a man with equipment and rifle and to make sure the soldiers carried to wounded man to the end point even the log was painted with the numbers so no cheating could happen!

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The MK-12 Re-entry system came to us in about 1200 pieces, we tested, inspected  and assembled every piece. I was a 46350 Nuclear Weapons Specialist, our tech school was at Lowry AFB in Denver. It was around 4 months long, then we had a follow-on 4 week school for the MMIII system. The actual warhead was assembled by Sandia and General Electric, then shipped to us by Military Airlift Command.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/W78_MK12A_RV_Minuteman_III.jpg.

Ogden was know as OAMA, Ogden Air Material Area, they maintained the parts for the MMIII. I got the opportunity to go to Vandenberg AFB 4 times for missile tests..quite exciting for a young guy from the Ozarks.

My four years in nukes was spent at FE Warren AFB, WY...loved that place....

"I don't know if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or imbeciles who mean it."-Mark Twain
'Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect.'- Benny Hill (1924-1992)

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I never knew that job existed. I thought the RV's all came pre-assembled and went straight to the WSA before being pulled by MMT for a bomb swap or regeneration.

Fascinating.

Incidentally, I wore that Combo 3A in tech school at Chanute and for a year or two at Whiteman until it was phased out. I think the last year for wear was '84 or '85. Not certain though.

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I was dressed up to pull CQ at tech school at Lowry AFB, 1972. I generally wore fatigues or the white coveralls with all my patches on it.

We also had to periodically have the the weapons brought back to the WSA (bomb dump) to change out parts that had time limits on them. That was always fun.

"I don't know if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or imbeciles who mean it."-Mark Twain
'Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect.'- Benny Hill (1924-1992)

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How did you test this weapons? Where they ever test fired (without the live warhead of course!)? was the target into the sea. This sound stupid for a atomic weapon but how accurate where they? Could they hit a certain targets or general area? I think I read that such weapons had more than one bomb, even 4 or 5? does the picture show 3 warheads?

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Yes. There were several types of tests.

The first test involved pulling the sortie, shipping it to Vandenberg AFB in California and emplacing it into an operational test launch facility. Each base did this concurrently in an exercise called Missile Combat Competition. It was for points and each year one base won the Blanchard Trophy. Whiteman AFB won it five times.

This missile was launched downrange into the south Pacific.

In another type of test called SELM, Simulated Electronic Launch Minuteman, the launch facility was isolated from the rest of the squadron, the first stage ignition circuits was electrically isolated, and the launch teams and launch was electrically simulated all the way up to the door being explosively blown from the launcher.

Two of the four squibs that blew the 110 ton launcher closure were deactivated and the door was heavily sandbagged to keep it from rolling off of the rail.

This test was not a competition, but each team involved was graded on their performance by QC teams watching every move you made. I was responsible for electrically isolating the first stage ignition along with my Team Member while a QC team watched us perform the procedure. There could be no mistakes performing this task. IIRC it also involved a BT and G&C can swap for the MMT teams.

Exact accuracy of Minuteman II and III was, and is classified. The CEP is within about 500'

Minuteman II carried one Mk 12C warhead. Minuteman III carried up to three, but START II limited that to one also. I am not certain of it's current configuration nor treaty enforcement at this time.

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The After Flight servicing on the Minuteman was a real bitch  ajb007/shifty

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Do you mean LF refurb? I can only imagine.

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As long as we're telling stories...

At a Whiteman AFB launch facility a few months before I arrived a maintenance tech was killed in the launch tube by not following the T.O. procedures.

Seems this maintenance troop either dropped a tool, or a cable or other item was tangled on the missile suspension system arm. This is a large shock-isolated suspension cage that supports the missile and 'floats' it within the launch tube in case of a near detonation of an opponent's warhead.

These vertical arms hold the missile until first stage ignition and then release the missile and violently slam against the launch tube liner.

This maintenance troop climbed out of the work cage and on to one of the suspension arms and something fired the squib that actuates one of the suspension arms.

The suspension arm smashed him between the arm and the launch tube liner killing him instantly.

He was supposed to be wed the following week to another Air Force member. A girl that I knew who worked in Missile Safety and Nuclear Surity knew this guy. She told me the story second hand from reports she received from people she knew in Wing Job Control.

That must have been pretty gruesome to have to clean up.

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It's a lot more accurate than 500 feet...I suspect the newer ones are very accurate. I think current configuration is one MK-12C warhead...we always built them with three, and some chaff dispensers...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZFnQEwxkeM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HNlOsko1H7Q

"I don't know if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or imbeciles who mean it."-Mark Twain
'Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect.'- Benny Hill (1924-1992)

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The only rocket I saw was the large anti aircraft missiles and the strela.

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When we took an reentry system apart for testing, we had to tag even the screws and washers as to where they went. Every electrical component was tested before we packed it for shipment. We flew from Wyoming to California on a KC-135 for my first test. It was exciting to me, I was a 2-striper and we got to see F-111s and F-4s refueling. We started rebuilding our bird, it was picked up and it seems to me that it launched about 5 days after we got back to Cheyenne. While at Vandenberg, however, I got to see two other Minuteman launches, a couple of Agenas and a really large Titan...that was an enormous rocket. My trip as crew chief in 1976 was really neat. We flew out on a C-141 and came back on a KC-10. We saw several launches out there, including a strange lift body of some sort..it was also the first time I ever saw an F-15, I had no idea what it was....but that sucker went straight up and was accelerating....

"I don't know if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or imbeciles who mean it."-Mark Twain
'Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect.'- Benny Hill (1924-1992)

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here is the other 2 films from the one i posted on the other page.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dThlBJwpUpo

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dThlBJwpUpo

They train very much like my regiment but we do not parachute. I see the demonstration of the anti terrorist on the bus. we did this sometimes at the show for the publics to watch.

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I just wanted to post these cool photos of a Norwegian Navy Special forces soldiers (MJK). The first one is the reflection of  a soldier and the unit emblem. The faces of marinejegers are always obscured or hidden on photos:

https://imbo.vgc.no/users/vgno/images/e31fceb10cebbc17be0493cfbafaadf8.jpg?t%5B%5D=crop%3Awidth%3D5330%2Cheight%3D3521%2Cx%3D0%2Cy%3D0&t%5B%5D=maxSize%3Awidth%3D654&publicKey=drpublish&accessToken=a730d767929a3442239919b14c8b12558d92ee570e1daf8276ba9aad56dc0e03




Members of MJK training Afghan Police Crisis Resonse Unit 222 in anti-terror operations:

https://imbo.vgc.no/users/bildespesial/images/682ec5253b960b4c42dba3aced017534.jpg?t%5B%5D=resize%3Awidth%3D1024%2Cheight%3D682&accessToken=c3c93c292c9510c1bd1a6d055f2608e28db38ac5ec6cc904b697c7d5ca10b921




Training on the Norwegian coast:

http://forskning.no/sites/forskning.no/files/styles/large/public/395298_marinesoldater_None.jpg?itok=vc4A_T1u




Anti-terror training on an oil platform:
https://forsvaret.no/media/PubImages/20151210OST_7357.jpg?Width=1158&Height=651


Sabotage operations training:
http://forskning.no/sites/forskning.no/files/styles/large/public/395299_marine_None.jpg?itok=e9uTaClU



The last hurdle on their obstacle coarse in Ramsund naval station, the northernmost special forces base in the world. The Ramsund base is further north than Iceland. The marinejegers tackle the obstacle coarce every morning, followed by a refreshing swim. :

http://i.imgur.com/u3eYSZo.jpg

Last edited by Number24 (16th Feb 2017 20:10)

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these are good photos. I like the one with the helicopter and the explosion, it look like a James Bond film!
The water must be very cold there to swim! I think they wear special suit under the uniform?

I said before that my regiment does a lot of training in the water and the swimming also but it is not so much cold to be careful but the predators. we swim were the crocodile and the tiger fish live and they will attack. The hippo can attack the boat also and kill. it is always interesting to swim in lakes and rivers! ajb007/wink

Back to the photo i mention. the men under the helicopter i think are sitting around a field gun yes? I can not see this properly but the way it is held by the helicopter and the shape looks as this?

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No, there isn't a field gun in the photo. I think it's a technique to lift a group of soldiers away quickly by helicopter. The heli drops a rope or two, the troops attach themselves to it and they fly away. Here is a photo of American troops doing this:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/92/U.S._Soldiers_with_the_7th_Special_Forces_Group_%28Airborne%29_are_suspended_by_a_CH-47_Chinook_helicopter_during_Special_Purpose_Insertion_Extraction_%28SPIE%29_training_event_at_Eglin_Base_Air_Force_Base%2C_Fla_130205-A-YI554-197.jpg/399px-thumbnail.jpg


The MJK are combat divers, but most of the time I think they use gore-tex uniforms and thermal underwear.
While the MJK are probably second to none in arctic special operations, I think your unit is far better in jungle operations  ajb007/biggrin
The things you tell from the excersises are impressive!

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Thank you number 24. I see with the photograph better. We use these also but we call them 'hot extraction harness'. they are to be used to lift the commando soldiers from places under fire or other danger where a helicopter cannot land. We wore them all times when on exercises or operation. For infiltration, the rope from the helicopter to the ground when the helicopter can not land.
I must say, my unit does not train in the jungle, no jungles in my country! I put these photographs here which I take from the internet to show the country. Our training and selection takes place in this type of country, the bush country which is hard country. 
https://s11.postimg.cc/gqnx1830v/bush.jpg



https://s28.postimg.cc/lahznxrtl/gorge_1.jpg

These is the type of places we do the 120km route march. no food allowed, empty stomach before and only little water. 48 hours to do the march. as you see this is hard country to cross. navigate as the patrol while looking for wild animal who will attack. Many trainees have been killed or injured in selection.

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Also if you watch the video of the Zambian commando  regiment on part two and three you see also soldiers from my country training with them. you can see them by the camouflage pattern of the uniform is different to the Zambian uniforms. much training is done with the special units of our countries.

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Joshua wrote:

Thank you number 24. I see with the photograph better. We use these also but we call them 'hot extraction harness'. they are to be used to lift the commando soldiers from places under fire or other danger where a helicopter cannot land. We wore them all times when on exercises or operation. For infiltration, the rope from the helicopter to the ground when the helicopter can not land.
I must say, my unit does not train in the jungle, no jungles in my country! I put these photographs here which I take from the internet to show the country. Our training and selection takes place in this type of country, the bush country which is hard country. 
https://s11.postimg.cc/gqnx1830v/bush.jpg



https://s28.postimg.cc/lahznxrtl/gorge_1.jpg

These is the type of places we do the 120km route march. no food allowed, empty stomach before and only little water. 48 hours to do the march. as you see this is hard country to cross. navigate as the patrol while looking for wild animal who will attack. Many trainees have been killed or injured in selection.

I'm sorry, but many of us Europeans know too little about Africa and African nations. When I read about crocodiles and hippos, we tend to think of jungles. But believe it or not, Norwegian Special Forces have in the last few years started training in jungles and in the desert! I would never have have expected that. Here they are:

https://imbo.vgc.no/users/bildespesial/images/5f5208fe163eb86b8d7447d5b3f8a769.jpg?t%5B%5D=resize%3Awidth%3D2048%2Cheight%3D1978&accessToken=b6dd9cacba9a116afc72e6b1b927ffbb279ebbc70f35ad154c4cc4e43fe98140

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I spend only four years in the US Navy, but went through two months of basic training so when you described barracks life I got flashbacks.  The men training us were in our faces during all waking hours (most of the time yelling) having us do constant physical exercises and drilling and making sure all our personal gear was shined and in it's place and without one fold out of place or one wrinkle.  God help you if that happened!  I tell civilians it was basically like being in a maximum security prison (and the food was probably the same quality).  We had one instance where we went out for drills and came back to find the barracks in a shambles.  The trainers had found a couple of mistakes in some of the way gear was put away or a bunk was made so they tore apart EVERY man's cot and scattered everyone's gear around them.  Then they gave us x amount of time to get it back in place and do it right for another inspection.  It was all just a way to stress test us of course, but it certainly worked!

I was very fortunate in my service posting - I was placed on the Allied Forces Southern Europe (AFSOUTH) NATO base in Naples, Italy for my entire enlistment.  I was supposed to be there only two years, but I was found to be a good enough asset in the time I spent there that they decided it was better to keep me on rather than having to train someone else.  I had almost a civilian like office job working weekdays with the weekends off.  Having a Top Secret security clearance I got to work among high ranking officers from the US, Italy, UK, Greece and Turkey.  I was a Draftsman-Illustrator and was one of a few men who designed the charts, graphs and other graphic material for the plans developed for the military defense of the Meditarranean. I got to be present during top secret NATO briefings (we had to run the slideshows and make sure charts and maps were in place) and I got to have great working relationships with outstanding officers from the different countries involved.  One of the many friends I made while there was a Navy SEAL who would be there on occasion officially and we still keep in touch to this day.  I decided not to make this a career because I just got fed up with the bureaucratic politics that institutions of this size seemed to be infested with.  I wanted a career where I was able to make my own decisions and I'm still glad I made that choice, though I have never regretted my service or the great life experiences it provided me.

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Ammo08 wrote:

I spent 4 years in the regular Air Force building nuclear weapons for the Minuteman III from 1972-1976. In 1986 I joined the Missouri Air National Guard at St Louis and built bombs, missiles and rockets, and strung ammo for the F-4E and F-15A fighters...In 1992 I transferred to the Tennessee Air Guard at Memphis, (my hometown) and spent 18 years working in supply and training. I retired in early 2011. I was deployed to the UK, Germany, and the Middle East...

If the good Lord would let me go around again, I would do it again...

https://scontent.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-0/p206x206/1010147_10203003205866085_3552246414438883449_n.jpg?oh=2d3d2c51e11ed812fe298679d9e0eef5&oe=5908CE91  A long time ago in a city, far, far away....

I can't imagine having a job that closely linked to...... well, third world war. I wouldn't want your job. I can (sort of) relate to knowing that if I saw active war service it would be the last war, since if USSR invaded northern Norway it would be to take on the entire NATO. We wpuld simply be the some of the Western forces closest to the USSR. I know that my job in case WWII started would be to lay minefields around Bodø Air Base and defend it as long as posible while the Americans and other forces few in.

Are there anyone else who know what and where their jobs would be in case the Soviets attacked?

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CmdrAtticus i enjoyed reading your post. Yes the training times were hard! I think i said in another post that the NCO could strike the recruit in my army and this made think more worse even. Also on the room inspection or parade if you had any small thing not correct then you name would be put in a book. if your name was in the book twice then you got punished.many times this would be 1 hour extra PT, in the evening, running in the square with full kit. this made you tired and late to do your other jobs of cleaning your kit and boots. we always slept on the floor by the beds so they were made up for inspection in the early morning, with the kit laid on them.

Number24, no hippos in the jungle I think! We were always taught to watch for the predator, the hippo is very aggressive and can run faster than a man on the land. As can also the crocodile for the short distance but not as fast as the hippo. The hippo will attack the boat and the peoples if they get too close.
I see your special unit to train in the jungles. Many predators there also I think but not the big game.
On the exercise sometimes as trained commando we would be dropped in the helicopter by the rope, in the middle of the bush on the self or two or three men. The only things we had is a compass and a knife, no food or water, and we would have to go the 50 or 60 kilometers through the bush to the rendezvous. the distance was the straight line but this was through the very hard country and many obstacles to go round so this distance might be 20 kilometers extra to that.
This training was because we operated in the enemy territory and to train us to be able to survive if we were alone and to try to get back to safety. This i think were some of the harder training but i think that we never lost one soldier in this during my service, but selection there were many recruits who got killed or hurt by the wild animal or the accident.

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We were getting a briefing one night about what to do after an attack, as though there would be an after. We all decided that if it happened we were going out on the lawn and drink a beer and have a cigarette and watch the RVs come in....they're quite pretty.....http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/usa/icbm/Slide86.JPG

"I don't know if the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or imbeciles who mean it."-Mark Twain
'Just because nobody complains doesn't mean all parachutes are perfect.'- Benny Hill (1924-1992)

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Our job was to deploy to a bridge in Germany hold it while those in front evacuated over it and then blow it and go partisan against our Ruski invaders. Years later I found out they would have gone full Blirtzkreig on us and bypassed us straight for the Channel, returning later to mop us up from the rear.

Sometimes ignorance is bliss  ajb007/biggrin

Cheers  ajb007/bond

My name is Bond, Basildon Bond - I have letters after my name!